Measuring Progress

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Intersectionality
  • Measuring and Evaluating

SOURCE
  • Project Include

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Measuring Progress

Project Include
Project Include is a non-profit that uses data and advocacy to accelerate diversity and inclusion solutions by offering recommendations about measuring diversity and inclusion progress in an organization.

Some recommendations include:

  • Set employee, leadership, board, and investor demographic diversity goals
  • Regularly conduct thoughtfully designed employee engagement surveys and demographic data
  • Regularly review and update data policies
  • Use inclusive demographic breakdowns, such as race, gender, and family status
  • Use existing metric definitions and surveys that have been effective in the past
  • Use metrics that are consistent across the industry
  • Be transparent about data findings internally and share some data externally
  • Ensure all sensitive data is stored and handled appropriately

To learn more, click here.

Diversity and Inclusion Survey: Building a More Inclusive Future

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Baseline Assesment
  • Internal Communication
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Culture Amp

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • SSurvey

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Diversity and Inclusion Survey: Building a More Inclusive Future

Culture Amp
This survey was developed as the result of a collaboration between B Corp Culture Amp and consulting firm Paradigm. This survey has been recognized as an industry leader when it comes to measuring the employee experience of all groups of people.

This survey allows you to:

  • Measure how inclusive your organization is
  • Use heatmaps to highlight disparities between groups
  • See how your results compare to other companies with the Inclusion benchmark
  • Ensure your team is equipped to take action based on the applied experience of our most successful customers and research-driven interventions that offer promising results

To learn more, click here here.

Why Gender Matters: A Resource Guide for Integrating Gender Considerations into Communities Work at Rio Tinto

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Outreach Initiatives and Partnerships

SOURCE
  • Rio Tinto

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Community Outreach, Corporate Social Responsibility

LINK TO RESOURCE

Why Gender Matters: A Resource Guide for Integrating Gender Considerations into Communities Work at Rio Tinto

Rio Tinto
This guide provides organizations in the mining industry with direction on how to foster inclusive engagement and development by incorporating gender considerations into their work; avoiding putting women and men, communities and projects at risk; and better achieving diversity goals. The guide includes four phases for integrating gender into community work and connects all phases through inclusive engagement considerations to make sure women and men from different social groups can participate in meaningful and impactful ways.

The four stages of Communities work are:

  1. Know and understand the gender roles and responsibilities and the differences in women’s and men’s access to resources. Integrate gender considerations into: social impact assessment, baseline communities’ assessment, and social risk assessment.
  2. Plan and implement, avoiding adverse impacts and maximizing benefits. Integrate gender considerations into policies at business unit level, communities’ strategy and plans, operational plans and communities’ work, and standard operating procedures.
  3. Monitor, evaluate, and improve through accurate and reliable data. Use gender-sensitive indicators, evaluate gendered outcomes, review performance, and improve projects and plans.
  4. Report and communicate gender performance internally (e.g. annual reviews of community’s program) and externally (e.g. local Sustainable Development reports) to encourage feedback.

To learn more, click here.

CGLCC Supplier Diversity Program

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian LGBT+ Chamber of Commerce (CGLCC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • PProgram

TARGET AREA
  • Standards and Certifications

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

CGLCC Supplier Diversity Program

Canadian LGBT+ Chamber of Commerce (CGLCC)
The Canadian LGBT+ Chamber of Commerce’s (CGLCC) Supplier Diversity Program connects LGBT+ businesses in Canada with corporations, organizations, and government bodies eager to do business with them. CGLCC certifies LGBT+-owned businesses as diverse suppliers and helps them leverage that certification to grow their business, and it works with corporations, organizations, and government bodies to help them understand the LGBT+ market and connect with the CGLCC’s certified suppliers. CGLCC helps corporate members identify competitive suppliers of goods and services by participating in the Supplier Diversity Program.

To learn more, click here.

CAMSC Supplier Certification

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • CCertification

TARGET AREA
  • Standards and Certifications

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

CAMSC Supplier Certification

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
The Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC) certifies and links Aboriginal and minority-owned businesses to purchasing opportunities at major corporations across Canada and the United States. CAMSC Supplier Certification is a market access tool that provides suppliers with a direct access point to major corporations, which value the business benefits of an inclusive and diverse supply chain.

To learn more, click here.

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
The Playbook is a guideline to establishing a successful supplier diversity process for the private sector and discussesfive key factors that are critical for creating a robust supplier diversity process. It also provides examples from companies successfully putting each of these elements into practice.

  1. Business case and executive support: Develop the business case defining the value proposition, identifying the current state (industry benchmarking), strategy alignment, and outcomes to be achieved.
  2. Opportunity identification: Identify opportunities to create a robust supplier diversity process through supplier analysis, supplier engagement, and supplier development.
  3. Supporting processes: Develop and strengthen supportive processes, including alignment, inclusive sourcing, communications, and management.
  4. Measuring and reporting: Develop metrics and reporting tools, such as a scorecard for supplier diversity reporting.

To read the full Playbook, click here.

Let’s Speak Gender: 10 Principles of Gender-Responsive Communications for Development

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • UNDP

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, All Units, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Let's Speak Gender: 10 Principles of Gender-Responsive Communications for Development

UNDP
This resource provides guidance on gender-responsive representation in communications based on the premise that language can reinforce or subvert gender inequalities. It lists common mistakes made when communicating and how they contribute to gender inequality, and provides best practice examples to avoid or correct such behaviour.

There are 10 principles that can be used to reduce gender-based discrimination in communications:

  1. Go beyond featuring women: Explore various aspects of gender inequality.
  2. Ensure visibility for men and women: Include perspectives of women in decision-making processes.
  3. Do not diminish women’s contributions: Consider the role and impact of gender relations in portrayals.
  4. Do not reinforce gender stereotypes: Use non-stereotypical colours to represent men and women.
  5. Portray diversity: Consider the variety of experiences of men and women of different backgrounds.
  6. Use gender-responsive language: Use singular ‘they’, gender-inclusive job titles.
  7. Do not victimize: Show women and men as active participants to development, not beneficiaries.
  8. Do not patronize: Portray women accomplishing great results.
  9. Present facts, not judgements: Focus on presenting facts and quotes.
  10. Be open: Be open to listening, learning, and improving.

To learn more, click here.

Gender Portrayal Guidelines

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Ad Standards

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Portrayal Guidelines

Ad Standards
Advertising Standards Canada administers these guidelines with respect to the representation of women and men in advertisements. The guidelines are part of the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards, which is the Canadian advertising industry’s principal instrument of self-regulation. There are six guidelines:

  • Authority: Advertising should strive to provide an equal representation of women and men in roles of authority.
  • Decisionmaking: Women and men should be portrayed equally as single decisionmakers for all purchases, including big-ticket items.
  • Sexuality: Advertising should avoid the inappropriate use or exploitation of sexuality of both women and men.
  • Violence: Neither sex should be portrayed as exerting domination over the other by means of overt or implied threats, or actual force.
  • Diversity: Advertising should portray both women and men in the full spectrum of diversity and as equally competent in a wide range of activities both inside and outside the home.
  • Language: Advertising should avoid language that misrepresents, offends, or excludes women or men.

To read the full guide, click here.

A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Ontario Human Rights Commission

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

Ontario Human Rights Commission
This primer provides organizations with practical guidance for developing effective and fair ways to prevent and respond to human rights issues, including harassment, discrimination, and accommodation needs. This resource also lists several components of an effective set of organizational policies, procedures, and practices, such as the importance of establishing commitment from senior leadership, consulting stakeholder and expert groups, as well as understanding the complexity and size of the organization. It also states that all policies, plans, and procedures should reflect the current state of law and policy, consider organizational structural changes and barriers, and identify new human rights issues that may emerge.

The OHRC suggests that a complete strategy to prevent and address human rights issues should include:

  • A plan for preventing, reviewing and removing barriers
  • Anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policies
  • An internal complaints procedure
  • An accommodation policy and procedure
  • An education and training program
  • Stakeholder consultation and communication strategies

To learn more, click here.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: How Companies can Prepare, Prevent, Respond and Transform their Culture

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: How Companies can Prepare, Prevent, Respond and Transform their Culture

Catalyst
This report discusses the action organizations can take to create a safe and fair work environment for all employees beyond policies and training. According to Catalyst’s report, these are four important actions:

Prepare

  1. Cultivate a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment. Take proactive steps to make this policy and your company’s commitment visible.
  2. Set guidelines to help employees understand appropriate norms for human interaction and affection in the workplace.
  3. Create processes to consider how sexual harassment affects women of colour and other marginalized groups in your organization.
  4. Educate yourself about your organization’s policies and procedures for when the board should be involved with or notified of sexual harassment complaints.
  5. Galvanize across functions to help employees have quick access to resources.

Prevent

  1. Accelerate parity in representation of women at all levels, including your Board of Directors.
  2. Educate and train leaders on forms of sexual harassment – including how to escalate.
  3. Focus on effective anti-sexual harassment training.

Respond

  1. Reinforce your company’s zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment and retaliation.
  2. Investigate all claims promptly and fairly.
  3. Honour the target of sexual harassment and follow up accordingly.
  4. Allow space for support, understanding, and, ultimately, compassion.

Transform

  1. Build a climate of respect and accountability.
  2. Evaluate your company’s dominant business culture.
  3. Address heavy alcohol consumption at work functions.

Additional sexual harassment resources from Catalyst can be found here or at the links below: