Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: A Best Practices Guide for Recruitment, Hiring and Retention

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Canada Research Chairs

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion: A Best Practices Guide for Recruitment, Hiring and Retention

Canada Research Chairs
This guide provides an extensive list of recommendations to best address areas for improvement in the workplace with regards to recruitment and retention, and different stages within those processes. Even though it is targeted at academic and research institutions, most advice is translatable to any organization working towards equitable recruitment and promotion processes.

  1. Organizational allocation and planning: Evaluate performance on how well senior leadership implement diversity and inclusion principles and practices in their work;review current policies, practices, and procedures through an equity, diversity, and inclusion lens; etc.
  2. Job postings: Ensure that a diversity and inclusion expert reviews and approves the job posting before its posted; post only the qualifications and skills necessary for the job; etc.
  3. Search for candidates: Accept a full CV, ensuring that career interruptions due to parental leave, family care, extended illness, or community responsibilities do not negatively impact the assessment of a candidate’s productivity; mandate proactive targeted outreach to attract members of underrepresented groups; etc.
  4. Hiring committee: Ensure a diverse search committee is considered in all aspects of their work; provide mandatory training for all committee members; etc.
  5. Interview: Rank selection criteria prior to screening applications to ensure an unbiased, consistent, and transparent selection process; ensure the same assessment process is applied to all candidates; etc.
  6. Hiring decisions: Provide a written report to senior management on the selection process and the rationale when a member of the targeted group is unsuccessful; avoid using a candidate’s “fit” as a means to discriminate or indulge personal biases; etc.
  7. Retention and promotion: Collect self-identification data at all organizational levels and monitor and analyze this data for potential systemic barriers to advancement; conduct an environmental scan about the organization’s culture and how well it is doing in its equity, diversity, and inclusion work; etc.

To read more about the recommendations, click here.

A Guide for Business: How to Develop a Human Rights Policy

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising
  • Intersectionality

SOURCE
  • United Nations Global Compact

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide for Business: How to Develop a Human Rights Policy

United Nations Global Compact
This resource provides a comprehensive outline on how to develop a human rights policy to help an organization express its commitment to respect internationally recognized human rights standards. All companies have a responsibility to respect human rights, which means to avoid infringing on the human rights of others and to address these impacts where they occur. Thus, developing a human rights policy shows that a company understands its responsibility and provides a basis for embedding it through all business functions.

All policies should at minimum comprise an explicit commitment to respect all international recognized human rights standards (e.g. International Bill of Rights and ILO’s Declaration on the Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work); stipulations on company’s expectations of personnel, business partners, and other relevant parties; and information on how the company will implement its commitment.

These are the steps provided in this guide to develop a human rights policy:

  • Assign senior management responsibility to drive the process
  • Involve cross-functional personnel (human resources, legal, procurement, security, etc.) in the process to build understanding, know-how, and a sense of common purpose
  • Identify and draw on internal and/or external human rights expertise
  • Map existing company policies to identify human rights coverage and gaps
  • Conduct a basic mapping of the company’s key potential human rights impacts
  • Consult internal and external stakeholders to identify and respond to their expectations
  • Communicate the policy internally and externally
  • Reflect human rights policy in operational policies and procedures

To learn more, click here.

Flip the Script

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising
  • Intersectionality

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • All Units, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Flip the Script

Catalyst
This resource contains several infographics for using the correct language and wording in different areas to avoid reinforcing negative gender stereotypes in workplace culture. Words reflect workplace culture and can reinforce negative gender stereotypes. Stop using the phrases that harm women’s advancement opportunities and focus on performance and outcomes instead.

To learn more, click here.

How Managers Can Make Casual Networking Events More Inclusive

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Middle Management

LINK TO RESOURCE

How Managers Can Make Casual Networking Events More Inclusive

Harvard Business Review
This article outlines recommendations to address the lack of inclusion in casual networking events in the workplace or outside business hours. Organizing inclusive events that welcome employees from all backgrounds can create long-term change for diversity and inclusion.

  1. Learn more about your employees’ preferences, particularly those from underrepresented backgrounds. To ensure all women feel included, managers must first understand the practices that exclude them, as well as the barriers that stop them from attending work events (e.g. food, drink, and activities). Likewise, it is important to ask these questions privately to prevent the employee from feeling targeted using one-on-one meetings or anonymous surveys.
  2. Engage a diverse planning committee. Formal company events should have a diverse planning committee that understands how to serve a diverse group of people.
  3. Plan more events that don’t centre on alcohol. Networking events often revolve around alcohol, which can exclude people that don’t drink.
  4. Organize more daytime events. Day or lunchtime events could ensure all employees can participate.
  5. Be intentional when structuring events outside of business hours. Actively engage employees from all backgrounds by organizing events that promote interactions without triggering social anxiety and are considerate of diverse personalities, languages, cultures, ethnicities, and physical abilities.
  6. Be intentional when making connections. Managers should use their influence to foster connections between people that can have a positive impact on employees.
  7. Audit the frequency of events and attendees. Find out how often the team meets informally, as well as formally, and the demographic of attendees each time. This information can guide action.
  8. Constantly look for blind spots and ask for feedback after the event. Request feedback to identify areas of improvement. Likewise, be open and accepting when receiving feedback as this can build trust and promote an inclusive environment.

 

To learn more, click here.

Women and the Future of Work

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, CEO, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Women and the Future of Work

Catalyst
Catalyst’s research demonstrates that leaders who attempt to implement a more integrated view of diversity, equity, and inclusion are able to establish the foundation for a more innovative and collaborative workforce. To create a “more human workplace,” leaders should:

  1. Develop, recognize, track, and reward inclusive teamwork skills such as listening, curiosity, humility, creativity, and courage.
  2. Update leadership expectations and training so leaders from the top down are modelling these behaviours.
  3. Hold teams accountable for collaborating and innovating across departments, cultures, technologies, and regions.
  4. Build an empathetic workplace where employees can speak their truth – which may result in a culture that is less likely to tolerate gender inequality and sexual harassment.

To read more, click here.