Building a Workplace Flexibility Strategy – A Guide to Building an Organization-Wide Approach to Implementing and Managing Workplace Flexibility

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Building a Workplace Flexibility Strategy – A Guide to Building an Organization-Wide Approach to Implementing and Managing Workplace Flexibility

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This guide provides a holistic frameworkto support a strategic approach to implementing organization-wide workplace flexibility programs. Specifically, the aims are to:

  • Ensure alignment between an organization’s workplace flexibility strategy, gender equality strategy, and broader business strategy.
  • Enable organizations to design a comprehensive workplace flexibility strategy.
  • Enable organizations to develop and implement an organization-wide approach for improving flexibility capability.

Also, this resource provides steps to building a workplace flexibility strategy:

  1. Envision a clear vision of what the organization looks like with improved flexibility.
  2. Ensure leadership commitment, support, and involvement, especially while running workshops.
  3. Develop specific goals and actions for each capability area (from the Readiness Assessment).
  4. Create an implementation plan based on the goals and actions with corresponding outcomes.
  5. Evaluate through an established learning cycle that includes pilot, testing, learning, adjustment, and retesting to find the best-suited strategy for the organization.

To learn more, click here.

Gender Diversity on Boards in Canada – Recommendations for Accelerating Progress

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Leadership
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Board of Directors, Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Board of Directors

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Diversity on Boards in Canada – Recommendations for Accelerating Progress

Catalyst
This report was created to help Canadian organizations make progress on achieving gender parity on boards by promoting the adoption of targets. It also presents an analysis of the benefits of gender parity for board of directors, examines disclosures related to board renewal mechanisms, and describes best practices from leading businesses.

Recommendations for accelerating progress for women on boards include:

  1. Set the following specific targets, and achieve them within three to five years:
    1. 30 percent women board directors, if you currently have at least one woman director.
    2. One woman board director, if you currently have zero women board directors.
  2. Use at least one mechanism to facilitate board renewal (e.g. term, age limit).
  3. Establish a written policy describing how the company specifically plans to increase representation of women on its board.
  4. Review board recruitment policies:
    1. Require that lists of potential board candidates consist of at least 50 percent women candidates with the skills and profile sought, and ensure diversity among women too.
    2. Require that women – including women from diverse communities – comprise at least 50 percent of the interview pool for every open board position.
    3. Implement board effectiveness assessments, including gap analysis using skills matrices.
    4. Leverage broad networks – not just the usual suspects.
  5. Champion senior executive women for board service by:
    1. Reassessing and removing restrictions on external board service.
    2. Implementing programs to match talent with board vacancies.
  6. Address gender equity at all levels of the organization by:
    1. Reviewing, on a continual basis, all human resources systems to ensure they are unbiased.
    2. Investing in inclusive leadership training.
    3. Monitoring and tracking promotion rates, aim for proportional rates at each level.
    4. Evaluating and addressing pay equity by:
      1. Conducting periodic pay equity studies.
      2. Implementing “no negotiations” policies and paying for work, not potential.
  7. Adopting pay transparency policies.

To learn more, click here.

Board of Directors Playbook

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Leadership
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Canadian Gender & Good Governance Alliance

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Board of Directors, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Board of Directors

LINK TO RESOURCE

Board Directors' Playbook

Canadian Gender & Good Governance Alliance
The Playbook provides information on common obstacles, the business case of gender diversity on boards, and tools for action in order to address this issue. The Playbook is a guideline for starting to address a Board of Director’s gender diversity.

The resource provides the following practical recommendations:

  1. Formal Board Evaluation Process: This process will help boards identify strengths and opportunities for improvement, as well as reveal current and future needs of the board.
  2. Term and Age Limits: Without vacancies, increasing the number of women on boards is difficult. Establishing a formal approach to board renewal will help find a balance between renewal of skills and perspectives and retaining long-term directors who still provide valuable contributions.
  3. Board Competency Matrix: Crafting the board competency matrix with skills and competencies that make directors effective could increase the pool of women candidates. Currently, markers are thought to be limited to résumé markers that are not reflective of boardroom effectiveness.
  4. Gender Diversity Policy: According to CGGA, adopting a Gender Diversity Policy improves the representation of women on boards regardless of company size.
  5. Board Member Recruitment: In order to avoid biased recruiting, broadening the search can help identify the best women candidates. Expand the scope by using board-ready lists, networking with industry peers and advisors, engaging a search firm, and maintaining an evergreen list of candidates.

To learn more, click here.

Bias in Performance Management Review Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Cook Ross

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Bias in Performance Management Review Process

Cook Ross
This resource explains the four domains of bias in performance management: rater bias, self-rater bias, structural bias, and calibration bias. It also includes several examples of how to mitigate each type of bias.

Rater bias: Difference between in-person performance reviews between men, compared to between men and women.

Examples of how to mitigate rater bias:

  • Give performance reviews the importance they deserve – avoid haste and distractions.
  • Use a performance management assessment aid to guide the process.

Self-rater bias: Misrepresentation of an individual’s performance self-evaluation between accomplishments and self-image.
Examples of how to mitigate self-rater bias:

  • Raters should be conscious of the potential cultural or gender differences in self-rating.
  • Reduce self-rater bias on performance reviews by exercising practices of objectivity.

Structural bias: Bias found in and reinforced by organizational structure.
Examples of how to mitigate structural bias:

  • Have clear and transparent rating areas and weighting processes.
  • Expose structural biases prior to performance reviews and continually address them.

Calibration bias: Bias originated from relative rating of performance reviews.

 

Examples of how to mitigate calibration bias:

  • Having a clearly defined process for identifying and discussing bias throughout the calibration process will yield a more objective comparison between people.
  • Introducing bias management strategies prior to performance reviews allows the normalization of bias awareness and can assist in objective discussions during the calibration meeting.

To read more about biases and how to mitigate them, click here.

7 Ways You Might be Overlooking Talent – How Unconcious Bias can Play Out in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Center for Creative Leadership

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, CEO, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

7 Ways You Might be Overlooking Talent – How Unconcious Bias can Play Out in the Workplace

Center for Creative Leadership
This resource lists unconscious biases that negatively impact people’s opportunities to advance in their career and examples of specific actions to fight them. As female employees often face higher barriers to advancement due to bias and stereotypes, becoming aware of what those biases are can help address them.

  • Likeability: Depending on one’s dimension(s) of diversity (race, gender, ethnicity, etc.), one’s likeability may be perceived differently.
  • Similar to me: Unintentionally gives higher ratings to employees who are similar to them.
  • Personal: Individual preferences may prevent objective analysis of an employee.
  • Horns and halos: Managers may make assumptions that a particular type of employee is naturally good or bad at the job.
  • Stereotyping: People may assign attributes to an entire group and act upon those ideas.
  • Shifting standards: Leaders may not realize they’re applying more stringent standards to one similarly situated employee over another.
  • Confirmatory: Once a judgement or recommended action is made, people are highly motivated to find or produce evidence to justify it.

Examples of strategies for fighting unconscious bias at work:

  1. Look back at talent conversations and assess if any unconscious bias might have been at play.
  2. Assess past selection processes to determine if the candidates you considered were all men – perhaps all white men – and why.
  3. Establish a practice to recognize if your selection process is overlooking talent.

To learn more, click here.

Textio Hire App

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Internal Communication
  • Marketing and Advertising
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Textico

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Textio Hire App

Textico
This app has been identified as an effective tool to analyze language in job descriptions to attract a more diverse applicant pool. The app uses real-world hiring outcomes from millions of job posts and recruiting mails to suggest changes to the wording of your job posts. Johnson & Johnson is an example of a company that utilizes Textio. When the company piloted the app, they found a 9 percent increase in the number of women applying, which equates to approximately 90,000 additional women each year.

To learn more, click here.

Winning the Fight for female Talent – How to Gain Diversity Edge Through Inclusive Recruitment

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • PwC

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Winning the Fight for female Talent - How to Gain Diversity Edge Through Inclusive Recruitment

PwC
This study analyzes inclusive recruitment practices from over 300 respondents in 18 different countries and in several sectors. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) commissioned Opinium Research to carry out an in-depth international survey of executives with responsibility for diversity within their organizations.

The top five diversity practices identified by respondents to have the most impact on their recruitment efforts:

  1. Establishing gender diversity recruitment targets
  2. Delivering diversity/unconscious bias training to our interviewers
  3. Establishing equality policies
  4. Actively focusing on having an inclusive talent brand
  5. Requiring mandatory diverse slates for open positions

The top three recruitment-specific practices to support diversity in this process were:

  1. Ensuring the diversity of the interview panel or interviewers throughout the interviewing process
  2. Training recruitment professionals to equip them to focus on driving more inclusive recruitment efforts
  3. Reviewing role descriptions to ensure use of inclusive language

In addition, the study ranked the three most attractive employer traits for women overall:

  1. Opportunities for career progression
  2. Competitive wages and other financial benefits
  3. Flexible work arrangements and a culture of work-life balance

To learn more, click here.

Workplace Diversity Through Recruitment: A Step-by-Step Guide

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Ideal

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Workplace Diversity Through Recruitment: A Step-by-Step Guide

Ideal
This resource is a guide on how to effectively, fairly, and objectively increase diversity through company recruitment practices.

The guide outlines the following six tips:

Tip #1: Write your job posting more carefully to attract more diverse candidates

Tip #2: Offer workplace policies that are more appealing to diverse candidates

Tip #3: Use a personality assessment to recruit more diverse candidates

Tip #4: Use sourcing methods that contain more diverse candidate pipelines

Tip #5: Strategically seed your pipelines with more diverse candidates

Tip #6:Use innovations such as résumé screening using AI, blind résumés, and blind interviews

To learn more, click here.

Paradigm for Parity: A Call to Action for Gender Equality

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Baseline Assesment
  • Career Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Paradigm for Parity Coalition

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Paradigm for Parity: A Call to Action for Gender Equality

Paradigm for Parity Coalition
“The Toolkit” outlines several steps to improve gender balanced recruitment within a company, including understanding the baseline, improving your intake, and managing with a diversity mindset. The Paradigm for Parity® coalition is comprised of business leaders, board members, and academics committed to addressing the corporate leadership gender gap.

1. Understand the Baseline

  1. Current seniority snapshot
  2. Historical comparison snapshot
  3. Time in role analysis
  4. Hiring (three-year look-back)
  5. Promotion (three-year look-back)
  6. Employee engagement survey
  7. Post departure interviews

2. Improve Your Intake

  • Institute blind résumés
  • Create gender-neutral job descriptions
  • Establish diverse interview panels
  • Utilize pool-based hiring
  • Create a sourcing mechanism for bringing talented women of all backgrounds back on board
  • Require diverse hiring slates
  • Establish a diversity recruiting office

3. Manage with a Diversity Mindset

  • Combine unconscious bias training and a manager playbook
  • Create clear and accountable diversity objectives for individual managers
  • Institute slate-based promotion processes with full consideration of all diversity candidates
  • Cascade the “Plus One” tactic: This tactic requires all senior managers to add one diversity candidate to their leadership teams or executive committees
  • Create benefits to reduce “Other Time” barriers: Women of all backgrounds often face more responsibilities at home (children, aging parents, etc.)
  • Adopt the 70 percent rule: Make it a requirement that no single majority group (gender, ethnicity, etc.) can represent more than 70 percent of the participants

To learn more, click here.

The Guide to Gender Diversity in Employment – Employer’s Guide

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Atlantic Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Guide to Gender Diversity in Employment – Employer's Guide

Atlantic Ministers Responsible for the Status of Women
This resource provides a framework for identifying and taking action on a gender diversity strategy for the workplace. TheGuide is designed for employers, managers, and human resource personnel but is also an informative tool for all employees.

The steps outlined to create and maintain a gender-diverse workforce are:

  1. Document existing commitments and leadership policies
  2. Complete an organizational analysis of leadership roles
  3. Conduct a gender analysis of employment data
  4. Complete a pay analysis
  5. Outline employment policies and practices
  6. Analyzemarketing materials
  7. Write a summary report
  8. Develop a gender diversity action plan
  9. Implement and communicate the action plan
  10. Monitor, evaluate, and adjust the action plan

This guide also includes a human resources systemsreview through a series of checklists to determine if the organization’s policies and practices exclude or limit any gender in these systems. It comprises:

  • Recruitment, hiring, and selection
  • Training and development
  • Promotion
  • Retention and termination

To learn more, click here.