Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • FFramework

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

Business for Social Responsibility
This resource provides guidance on conducting gender-responsive due diligence within supply chains to organizations and suppliers through the Gender Data and Impact (GDI) Framework. The source describes how to make the case for supplier diversity, conduct and analyze gender-responsive assessments, track progress and improve accountability, and communicate progress.

These actions are contained in four phases, which all have a corresponding checklist:

Phase 1: Assess and Analyze

  • Review brand business practices
  • Understand country context and risks
  • Assess supplier workforce performance, profile, and impact data
  • Collect GDI indicators
  • Analyze GDI tool findings

Phase 2: Integrate and Act

  • For brands: act, enable, and influence
  • For suppliers: prioritize issues, define measures and targets, and implement within the business

Phase 3: Track

  • Differentiate between intervention and specific indicators and business as usual indicators and their tracking frequency
  • Use supplier visits to review and discuss ongoing progress towards a specific outcome or to monitor overall gender equality performance
  • Ensure that data collection and tracking become business as usual practices
  • Involve workers and experts in reviewing progress made

Phase 4: Communicate

  • Use gender data within your business
  • Align communication about the GDI with the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communicate with stakeholders
  • Use the GDI to cover investors’ expectations
  • Encourage suppliers to use GDI findings with their core practitioners’ team and worker committees/unions to foster social dialogue

For more detail, click here.

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

Business for Social Responsibility
This guide provides a framework for companies to integrate gender equality considerations into the standards they use to set supply chain ethical requirements. This guidance addresses nine Code of Conduct Principles and each principle looks into traditional code language, the principle through a women’s lens, case study examples, recommendations for gender-sensitive language revisions, and leadership actions related to the principle:

  1. Discrimination: It is recommended that language be included to specify that the principle of non-discrimination applies to both women and men and that roles and needs specific to women.
  2. Wages and Benefits: Include language about equal remuneration for men and women for work of equal value, etc.
  3. Working Hours: Working hours should be fixed according to national and international limits, and delivery targets should not be set unrealistically and as a way to avoid overtime pay.
  4. Harassment and Abuse: Define harassment and related policies, detail training sessions, and explicitly mention sexual harassment.
  5. Health and Safety: Focus on worker wellbeing and make provisions to guarantee workers access to health services and insurance that serve the distinctive concerns and needs of both women and men.
  6. Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining: Include language that stresses the rights of both women and men to freedom of association and collective bargaining.
  7. Employment Relationship: Extend the application of the code of conduct principles to contracting, subcontracting, homeworking, and recruitment agencies. Considering women often have the most precarious or vulnerable employment status, include specific provisions to protect them.
  8. Management Systems: Code of conduct, policies, procedures, training, and record-keeping should be designed to operationalize the specific gender considerations integrated.

To learn more, click here.

Supporting and Growing Women-Owned Businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Community Outreach, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supporting and Growing Women-Owned Businesses

Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders
In this research, the Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders has outlined specific initiatives to support women entrepreneurs.

Expanding the use of private sector supplier-diversity programs and increase outreach to women-owned businesses. “Best practices” capturing the full benefit of supplier diversity include:

  • Having a dedicated team focused on meeting specific supplier diversity targets.
  • Maintaining a central database of procurement needs and registered suppliers.
  • Prioritizing outreach efforts such as attending conferences and summits and working closely with networks, accelerators, and incubators in your sector.
  • Implementing a supplier diversity policy and a reporting mechanism.
  • Partnering with catalyzing organizations like WEConnect International, Women Business Enterprises Canada, National Women Business Owners Corporation (NWBOC) or Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC)to connect with women-owned businesses.

Challenge accelerators and professional networks to attract and develop women-owned businesses. “Best practices” that stand out in attracting and developing women entrepreneurs:

  • Tracking and transparency: MaRS Discovery District reached a 30 percent participation of female founders under the guidance of a female CEO.
  • Women-focused programming: Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneurial Winning Women program helped participants reach an average annual growth of 20 percent in revenue.
  • Co-ed networking: Entrepreneurs’ Organization provides all participants (male and female) with access to a network of entrepreneurs.
  • De-bias investment decisions: The Business Development unit in Bank of Canada conducted an independent accessibility review of all steps in a female entrepreneur’s journey.
  • Role modelling and public commitment: YPO Canada joined the #GoSponsorHer Challenge to encourage members to reach out to women entrepreneurs.

To learn more, click here.

The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) Base Code

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Ethical Trading Initiative

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • BBenchmark

TARGET AREA
  • Indices and Benchmarks

TARGET UNIT
  • Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) Base Code

Ethical Trading Initiative
The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) is a leading alliance of companies, trade unions, and NGOs that encourages businesses to have responsible supply chains and participate in ethical trade. The ETI Base Code is based on the conventions of the International Labour Organization and is viewed as a global reference standard that can also be used as a benchmark to develop ethical trade action plans and conduct social audits. By joining ETI, a business commits to the ETI Base Code and the principles of implementation, which guides the company to effectively approach ethical trade. ETI members also have access to a variety of training resources, expert advice, networking, and peer support.

The ETI Base Code’s categories are:

  1. Employment is freely chosen
  2. Freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining are respected
  3. Working conditions are safe and hygienic
  4. Child labour shall not be used
  5. Living wages are paid
  6. Working hours are not excessive
  7. No discrimination is practiced
  8. Regular employment is provided
  9. No harsh or inhumane treatment is allowed

For more information, click here.

KnowTheChain

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Know The Chain

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • BBenchmark

TARGET AREA
  • Indices and Benchmarks

TARGET UNIT
  • Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

KnowTheChain

Know The Chain
KnowTheChain is a resource for companies and investors that benchmarks corporate practices in a variety of industries to help inform investors’ decisions.It also provides tools and resources to help companies be in compliance with both this act and the Modern Slavery Act.

The benchmarks evaluate a total of 23 indicators across the following themes:

  • Commitment and Governance
  • Traceability and Risk Assessment
  • Purchasing Practices
  • Recruitment
  • Worker Voice
  • Monitoring
  • Remedy

The benchmarks currently available are:

  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Food and Beverage
  • Apparel and Footwear

To learn more, click here.

SA8000 Standard

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Social Accountability International (SAI)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • SStandard

TARGET AREA
  • Standards and Certifications

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

SA8000 Standard

Social Accountability International (SAI)
Businesses can use the SA8000® Standard to ensure that human rights are upheld, and employees are treated fairly and with respect throughout the entire supply chain. Social Accountability International is a global non-governmental organization that offers a wide number of resources to help businesses enhance their social performance and advance human rights at work. The SA8000® Standard helps certified businesses uphold social performance expectations throughout their supply chains, demonstrate their dedication to the fair treatment of workers across industries, and improve their management systems to address and prevent social and labour risks. The scope of the Standard includes all personnel in the business’s control who provide goods or services for the business, including suppliers, sub-contractors, sub-suppliers, and home workers.

The nine social accountability requirements of the SA8000® Standard are:

  1. Child labour
  2. Forced or compulsory labour
  3. Health and safety
  4. Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining
  5. Discrimination
  6. Disciplinary practices
  7. Working hours
  8. Remuneration
  9. Management systems

To access supporting documents about the certification, click here.

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
The Playbook is a guideline to establishing a successful supplier diversity process for the private sector and discussesfive key factors that are critical for creating a robust supplier diversity process. It also provides examples from companies successfully putting each of these elements into practice.

  1. Business case and executive support: Develop the business case defining the value proposition, identifying the current state (industry benchmarking), strategy alignment, and outcomes to be achieved.
  2. Opportunity identification: Identify opportunities to create a robust supplier diversity process through supplier analysis, supplier engagement, and supplier development.
  3. Supporting processes: Develop and strengthen supportive processes, including alignment, inclusive sourcing, communications, and management.
  4. Measuring and reporting: Develop metrics and reporting tools, such as a scorecard for supplier diversity reporting.

To read the full Playbook, click here.

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • UN Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

UN Women
This is a guide for gender-responsive procurement that provides corporations and their suppliers with a deeper understanding of challenges preventing women-owned businesses from fully participating in local and global value chains. It discusses key procurement topics such as:

Overcoming challenges facing women-owned business enterprises: The private sector can reform corporate procurement policies and practices to be more inclusive to support to overcome challenges facing women-owned businesses. Strategic sourcing practices include:

  • Increasing access to information and social networks
  • Streamlining the application process
  • Streamlining the contracting process
  • Limiting contract sizes
  • Establishing appropriate award criteria
  • Providing feedback
  • Paying promptly

Building corporate capacity and commitment: To reach a stage where gender-responsive procurement has become an integral part of the corporate culture and practice, an organization can develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses, identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management, etc. There are eight guidelines for introducing best practices:

  • Establish corporate policy and top corporate management support
  • Develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses
  • Establish comprehensive internal and external communications
  • Identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management
  • Establish comprehensive supplier development process
  • Establish tracking, reporting, and goal-setting mechanisms
  • Establish a continuous improvement plan
  • Establish a second-tier supplier program

To access this resource and learn more, click here.