What is the Link Between Business Strategy and Workplace Design?

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • JLL

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

What is the Link Between Business Strategy and Workplace Design?

JLL
This article provides recommendations for workplace wellbeing when considering office (re)construction, layout, and design with a focus on human experience, digital drive, continuous innovation, operational experience, and financial performance.

Employers can consult the Future of Work’s recommendations:

  • Start with your employeesFind out their needs and provide workplace solutions to engage and empower
  • Consider sustainable design from the outset. E.g. green walls, reclaimed building materials; water and plant features, energy-tracking
  • Engage a team of workplace professionalsHelp balance plans, budget, design, and change management
  • Keep mobility and flexibility at the front of mindSpaces should be multipurpose
  • BeadaptableSpaces should be updated every two to five years
  • Be bold, be courageousChange may be protested but progress is necessary

To learn more, click here.

Want to Improve Gender Equality at Work? Help Men Take Parental Leave

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • MERCER

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Employee Support, Family-friendly

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Want to Improve Gender Equality at Work? Help Men Take Parental Leave

MERCER
This article is based on MERCER’s 2018 “Global Parental Leave Report” and provides an overview of some of its most relevant findings. Additionally, it provides five key areas for employers to consider with regards to men, parental leave, and gender equality.

  1. Review parental leave policies to either match paternity and maternity leave policy or implement a “non-gender-biased” parental leave policy.
  2. Gain leadership support by increasing awareness of paternal leave and its benefits through data.
  3. Build a corporate culture that supports paternal leave in all levels of the organization. This may require education, establishing resource groups, reviewing other HR and departmental policies.
  4. Educate and support managers on how to manage leave as their direct relationship with employees is essential.
  5. Improve social support for leave to reduce stigma that may impact men by communicating the organization’s efforts and actively confronting gender and social stigma.

To learn more, click here.

What Men Can Do to Be Better Mentors and Sponsors to Women

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Leadership

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Programs and Initiatives

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

What Men Can Do to Be Better Mentors and Sponsors to Women

Harvard Business Review
This article explores the need for companies to develop sponsorship programs to uplift the diverse talent in their organizations. The article provides eight key recommendations for leaders and companies to improve their sponsorship programs:

  1. Identify high potential diverse talent: Sponsors should look for driven and ambitious individuals with different experiences and perspectives from their own. They should seek the help of HR and other leaders if needed.
  2. Determine the best stretch role: Sponsors should support protégés for opportunities with high visibility that would benefit both the individual as well as the business. Some conditions to identify the best opportunities are: high risk, involve working with strategic clients, an assignment ofstrategic importance to the business, starting something new, etc.
  3. Position the role: Sponsors should consistently encourage protégés to overcome barriers and give them confidence to advance their position in a given company.
  4. Provide opportunities for development and support: Sponsors should support their protégés in achieving the skills and expertise needed to succeed. Furthermore, they should ensure that these resources are provided by their organization. Additionally, the organization should educate sponsors on the unique challenges faced by more vulnerable groups, including women of colour.
  5. Pave the way: Sponsors should take the responsibility of introducing their protégés to relevant influential individuals in their network that would benefit their success.
  6. Ensure protégés receive candid, performance-based feedback: Sponsors should ensure that their protégés receive clear assessments of their performance with specific guidance to help them improve their results and promote career development.
  7. Help protégés persist: Sponsors must ensure that their organization supports their protégé in light of mistakes or criticism from others.
  8. Champion promotions and recognition: Sponsors should outwardly advocate for their protégés to receive raises, promotions, and recognition if deserving.

To learn more, click here.

A Lack of Sponsorship is Keeping Women from Advancing into Leadership

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Programs and Initiatives

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Lack of Sponsorship is Keeping Women from Advancing into Leadership

Harvard Business Review
This article explores the varying degrees of sponsorship as a tool for executives who are looking to sponsor women, and women who are aiming to advance their careers. The spectrum can be a useful tool to address barriers in implementing successful sponsorship programs. The article suggests that sponsorship does not have to be all-or-nothing. Rather sponsorship can be considered a spectrum of behaviour with varying degrees of commitment.

From private to public relationships and from the least commitment to the most, the spectrum of sponsorship includes:

  1. Mentor: Provides personal advice, support, or coaching privately, with a commitment of only time.
  2. Strategizer: A strategizer is an executive who shares “insider information” about advancing in the company. They work with their mentee to strategize how to advance in the company, addressing any barriers the mentee may face within the organization.
  3. Connector: A connector is an executive who introduces and talks up their mentee to influential individuals in their network. This allows them to gauge how their mentee is seen by others.
  4. Opportunity giver: An opportunity giver promotes or assigns their mentee to a project or position with high visibility, within their capacity.
  5. Advocate: This is the classic sponsorship relationship that involves a sponsor advocating someone they are sponsoring for a significant role. In this case, the sponsor not only commits their time but also their reputation.

To learn more, click here.

How to Mentor or Sponsor Women Without Sending the Wrong Message

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development

SOURCE
  • HR Dive

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Programs and Initiatives

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

How to Mentor or Sponsor Women Without Sending the Wrong Message

HR Dive
This article includes recommendations for mentoring and sponsoring programs to ensure they don’t send the wrong message within the organization.

  1. Have a formal structure.
  2. Get support and commitment from the CEO and senior executives to become sponsors or mentors, and to provide resources for these programs.
  3. Create programs for both women and men. Mentoring and sponsorship programs only for women send the wrong message that women cannot success without extra training and help.
  4. Ensure that the relationships are as diverse as possible. People tend to sponsor people who look like them which could limit opportunities for women, visible minorities, people with disabilities, etc. Aim for multigenerational, multicultural, and multidisciplinary programs.
  5. Establish two-way relationships. Both parties should gain from the relationship.
  6. Establish goals on which both parties agree to determine what the expected results are from the relationship.
  7. Include training for sponsors and protégés as part of the program to ensure both parties understand their roles.

To learn more, click here.

Intersectionality and the Implications for Workplace Gender Equity

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising

SOURCE
  • The Rotman Institute for Gender and the Economy

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Intersectionality and the Implications for Workplace Gender Equity

The Rotman Institute for Gender and the Economy
Produced by the Rotman Institute for Gender and the Economy, this research brief describes what intersectionality is, and why it is important to approach workplace policies from an intersectional perspective.

The research brief contains a section that provides methods of reducing or eliminating intersectional inequalities in the workplace. Suggestions include:

  • Be specific in language use: Ensure the language your organization uses is inclusive to all intersectional identities, especially when hiring or recruiting outsiders.
  • Promote sponsorship over mentorship: White male sponsors should consider sponsoring females and visible minorities.
  • Get buy-in from management: Engage managers in solving problems of underrepresentation and increase managers’ contact with women and visible minority workers.
  • Track data on employee demographics: Track diversity data and alter practices to mitigate discriminatory behaviour.
  • Move beyond usual networks for recruitment and hiring: Use job boards that specifically target underrepresented groups.

To read the research brief, click here.

Five Ways to Enhance Board Oversight Culture

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Leadership
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • EY

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Board of Directors

LINK TO RESOURCE

Five Ways to Enhance Board Oversight Culture

EY
This resource was developed for board members in recognition that culture is a growing priority in the boardroom. The board is responsible for holding management accountable for the correlation between culture and business strategy, and it includes five ways to help boards govern culture in their organizations:

  1. Oversee how culture is defined and aligned to strategy: Include the cultural attributes needed to achieve the company’s overall strategic objectives.
  2. Create accountability for how culture is communicated and lived – internally and to key external stakeholder: Organizations should clearly identify the right behaviours, manage performance against those behaviours, and reinforce the board and executive team with incentive structures.
  3. Monitor how culture and talent metrics are measured to keep a pulse on how culture is evolving: Use analytics of cultural trends, benchmarking to other entities or standards to measure performance and accountability, inclusion and wellbeing, etc.
  4. Oversee intentional culture shifts to stay in step with strategy shifts: Understand the social network of the company and identify the “influencers” within the organization, and use both top-down approaches (e.g. performance and rewards systems) and bottom-up approaches (e.g. decisions and behavioural changes in local teams that create new norms).
  5. Challenge the board’s culture: The board sets the tone at the top regarding corporate culture – not just in the way that the board prioritizes and oversees the company’s culture but also in the composition, dynamics, and culture of the board itself.

This resource also includes questions for the board to consider, including:

  1. Does the board set the right tone at the top and give sufficient attention to culture as a key enabler of purpose and strategy?
  2. Does the board itself embody and reflect the company’s values?
  3. How comprehensively and specifically has the board discussed the importance of culture and helped define the desired culture?

To see more, click here.

Is Your Organizational Culture Holding Women Back in the Workplace?

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Forbes

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Is Organizational Culture Holding Women Back in the Workplace?

Forbes
This article discusses how in some cases, diversity and inclusion programs and quotas fail to lead to organizational change because the company culture has not changed. To begin to bring about meaningful change, the article recommends asking the following questions:

  1. Are all leaders vocal supporters of gender balance in business?
  2. What are the underlying beliefs about gender in your organization?
  3. Do you encourage people to talk about gender at work?
  4. How do you define and reward good leadership?
  5. Are you reinforcing the idea that it’s just women who need “fixing”?

To read more, click here.

How Managers Can Make Casual Networking Events More Inclusive

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Middle Management

LINK TO RESOURCE

How Managers Can Make Casual Networking Events More Inclusive

Harvard Business Review
This article outlines recommendations to address the lack of inclusion in casual networking events in the workplace or outside business hours. Organizing inclusive events that welcome employees from all backgrounds can create long-term change for diversity and inclusion.

  1. Learn more about your employees’ preferences, particularly those from underrepresented backgrounds. To ensure all women feel included, managers must first understand the practices that exclude them, as well as the barriers that stop them from attending work events (e.g. food, drink, and activities). Likewise, it is important to ask these questions privately to prevent the employee from feeling targeted using one-on-one meetings or anonymous surveys.
  2. Engage a diverse planning committee. Formal company events should have a diverse planning committee that understands how to serve a diverse group of people.
  3. Plan more events that don’t centre on alcohol. Networking events often revolve around alcohol, which can exclude people that don’t drink.
  4. Organize more daytime events. Day or lunchtime events could ensure all employees can participate.
  5. Be intentional when structuring events outside of business hours. Actively engage employees from all backgrounds by organizing events that promote interactions without triggering social anxiety and are considerate of diverse personalities, languages, cultures, ethnicities, and physical abilities.
  6. Be intentional when making connections. Managers should use their influence to foster connections between people that can have a positive impact on employees.
  7. Audit the frequency of events and attendees. Find out how often the team meets informally, as well as formally, and the demographic of attendees each time. This information can guide action.
  8. Constantly look for blind spots and ask for feedback after the event. Request feedback to identify areas of improvement. Likewise, be open and accepting when receiving feedback as this can build trust and promote an inclusive environment.

 

To learn more, click here.

6 Steps for Building an Inclusive Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Society for Human Resources Management

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

6 Steps for Building an Inclusive Workplace

Society for Human Resources Management
This resource is aimed at HR professionals and discusses how successful diversity and inclusion requires a workplace culture where everyone is valued and heard. The SHRM has compiled six practical strategies for creating an inclusive culture:

  1. Educate your leaders: Keep them accountable (e.g. feedback from own managers, performance evaluation).
  2. Form an inclusion council: Carefully select a diverse and committed council comprising a dedicated group of eight to 12 influential leaders who are one or two levels below the CEO. ​
  3. Celebrate employee differences: Invite employees to share their backgrounds and traditions in the workplace (e.g. remote locations, different hours).
  4. Listen to employees: Conduct a comprehensive assessment of your organization’s demographics and people processes to develop specific strategies to promote inclusiveness.
  5. Hold more effective meetings: Distribute materials ahead of time, have virtual capabilities to participate, rotate meeting times, be conscious of your communication style, etc.
  6. Communicate goals and measure progress: Benchmark culture, conduct a full audit of your people processes, identify any shortcomings and measurable discrepancies around inclusivity, instill rigour and data into inclusion strategies, and establish a clear business case for inclusion in the workplace.

The resource also includes an inclusivity checklist for HR professionals:

  1. Train managers and hold them accountable to show that inclusivity is a core competency.
  2. Form an inclusion council.
  3. Identify underrepresented groups’ needs and give them necessary support and resources.
  4. Benchmark key aspects of your organization’s culture.

To see more, click here.