Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
The Playbook is a guideline to establishing a successful supplier diversity process for the private sector and discussesfive key factors that are critical for creating a robust supplier diversity process. It also provides examples from companies successfully putting each of these elements into practice.

  1. Business case and executive support: Develop the business case defining the value proposition, identifying the current state (industry benchmarking), strategy alignment, and outcomes to be achieved.
  2. Opportunity identification: Identify opportunities to create a robust supplier diversity process through supplier analysis, supplier engagement, and supplier development.
  3. Supporting processes: Develop and strengthen supportive processes, including alignment, inclusive sourcing, communications, and management.
  4. Measuring and reporting: Develop metrics and reporting tools, such as a scorecard for supplier diversity reporting.

To read the full Playbook, click here.

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • UN Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

UN Women
This is a guide for gender-responsive procurement that provides corporations and their suppliers with a deeper understanding of challenges preventing women-owned businesses from fully participating in local and global value chains. It discusses key procurement topics such as:

Overcoming challenges facing women-owned business enterprises: The private sector can reform corporate procurement policies and practices to be more inclusive to support to overcome challenges facing women-owned businesses. Strategic sourcing practices include:

  • Increasing access to information and social networks
  • Streamlining the application process
  • Streamlining the contracting process
  • Limiting contract sizes
  • Establishing appropriate award criteria
  • Providing feedback
  • Paying promptly

Building corporate capacity and commitment: To reach a stage where gender-responsive procurement has become an integral part of the corporate culture and practice, an organization can develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses, identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management, etc. There are eight guidelines for introducing best practices:

  • Establish corporate policy and top corporate management support
  • Develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses
  • Establish comprehensive internal and external communications
  • Identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management
  • Establish comprehensive supplier development process
  • Establish tracking, reporting, and goal-setting mechanisms
  • Establish a continuous improvement plan
  • Establish a second-tier supplier program

To access this resource and learn more, click here.

Advertising Guidance on Depicting Gender Stereotypes Likely to Cause Harm or Serious or Widespread Offence

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Committee of Advertising Practice (UK)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Advertising Guidance on Depicting Gender Stereotypes Likely to Cause Harm or Serious or Widespread Offence

Committee of Advertising Practice (UK)
The Committee of Advertising Practice of the UK created this guidance to help advertisers, agencies, and media owners interpret the CAP Code. This guidance is based on formal regulation in the UK banning gender stereotypes in advertising; however, it provides examples of scenarios featuring gender-stereotypical roles to avoid in advertisements.

  • Gender-stereotypical roles and characteristics: An ad that depicts a man with his feet up and family members creating mess around a home while a woman is solely responsible for cleaning up the mess.
  • Pressure to conform to an idealized gender-stereotypical body shape or physical features: An ad that depicts a person who was unhappy with multiple aspects of their life, then implies that all their problems were solved by changing their body shape.
  • Scenarios aimed at or featuring children: An ad that seeks to emphasize the contrast between a boy’s stereotypical personality (e.g. daring) with a girl’s stereotypical personality (e.g. caring) needs to be handled with care.
  • Scenarios aimed at or featuring potentially vulnerable groups: An ad aimed at new mums which suggests that looking attractive or keeping a home pristine is a priority over other factors such as their emotional wellbeing.
  • Scenarios featuring people who don’t conform to a gender stereotype: An ad that belittles a man for carrying out stereotypically “female” roles or tasks.

To read more, click here.

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Koç Holding Company

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

Koç Holding Company
The Koç Group, an investment holding company from Turkey, developed this guide to help transform workplaces and advance gender equality through effective communication. Communications professionals can use the guide as a resource to overcome gender stereotypes in marketing, communications, and brand management.

Gender-sensitive communications requires questioning gender stereotypes and enables mainstreaming gender equality. Gender-sensitive communications can be defined as such:

  • Inclusive use of language and visuals
  • Positioning of men and women so that they are equally represented, have equal access to resources and opportunities, enjoy balanced roles and have equal share in decisionmaking

Consider the following elements for gender-sensitive communications:

  • Who?: Question related to representation

Assess: the ratio of men to women; the age of all individuals being represented; the physical appearance and clothing of men and women in visual materials; and, how their roles are being portrayed

  • What?: Question related to the distribution of resources

Assess: who uses the time and for how long; who is pictured in what place; who owns the resources and earns the money; who uses public domain spaces and for how long; who receives what information; who is responsible for what; and, who makes the decisions and implements them

  • Why?: Question related to elements preventing equality

Assess: who owns what and why; why objects or services meet the needs of only men or women; why we assign resources and roles to only one gender; and, why does the slogan address only one gender

  • How?: Question related to determining new course forward to advancing gender-sensitivity

Assess: How does my approach ensure gender equality; is a new framework possible that better ensures gender equality; and, can I change my approach

To learn more, click here.

A Guide to Progressive Gender Portrayals in Advertising – The Case for Unstereotyping Ads

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • The World Federation of Advertisers

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide to Progressive Gender Portrayals in Advertising - The Case for Unstereotyping Ads

The World Federation of Advertisers
This guide emphasizes the need for the advertising industry to move away from gender stereotypes in advertising and provides advice and recommendations on how to do so.

Some of the recommendations include:

  1. Encourage diversity in your teams: Does my internal team and partner team at my agencies reflect my target audience?
  2. Track performance: What is the representation of women versus men in our ads? Are we testing our ads with an equal number of men and women, etc.?
  3. Find your purpose: What does my brand stand for that benefits both men and women?
  4. Think longterm: Where do we want to be in the next three years on gender diversity and proper representation? Campaigners and consumers want to see real commitment that goes beyond a single message or a particular day.
  5. Go beyond marketing: How can I promote more positive, diverse portrayals of men and women internally and among suppliers?

To learn more, click here.

Gender Portrayal Guidelines

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Ad Standards

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Portrayal Guidelines

Ad Standards
Advertising Standards Canada administers these guidelines with respect to the representation of women and men in advertisements. The guidelines are part of the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards, which is the Canadian advertising industry’s principal instrument of self-regulation. There are six guidelines:

  • Authority: Advertising should strive to provide an equal representation of women and men in roles of authority.
  • Decisionmaking: Women and men should be portrayed equally as single decisionmakers for all purchases, including big-ticket items.
  • Sexuality: Advertising should avoid the inappropriate use or exploitation of sexuality of both women and men.
  • Violence: Neither sex should be portrayed as exerting domination over the other by means of overt or implied threats, or actual force.
  • Diversity: Advertising should portray both women and men in the full spectrum of diversity and as equally competent in a wide range of activities both inside and outside the home.
  • Language: Advertising should avoid language that misrepresents, offends, or excludes women or men.

To read the full guide, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Domestic or Sexual Violence Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Domestic or Sexual Violence Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to domestic or sexual violence leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada, where applicable. Domestic or sexual violence leave allows employees to take time off if they, or their child, are experiencing or being threatened with domestic or sexual violence. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Critical Illness and Injury Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Critical Illness and Injury Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to critical illness leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada, where applicable. Critical illness leave allows employees to support a child or adult family member whose life is at risk due to illness or injury. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Compassionate Care Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Compassionate Care Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to compassionate care leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada. Compassionate care leave allows employees to support family members who have potentially life-threatening or terminal medical conditions. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • CSA Group

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

CSA Group
This guide provides direction on the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has developed thisstandard to help organizations protect the mental health oftheir employees and encourage their wellness. There are several resources available, including an implementation guide, posters, case study research, and testimonials. Another of these resources is a handbook, which includes a step-by-step guide for organizations to implement the standard in four key phases: build the foundation, identify opportunities, set objectives, and implement.

To access the handbook, click here.

To learn more about the Standard, click here.