Partnering and Partnership: Lessons Learned in the DI

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Outreach Initiatives and Partnerships

SOURCE
  • Devonshire Initiative

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Community Outreach, Corporate Social Responsibility, Diversity & Inclusion

LINK TO RESOURCE

Partnering and Partnership: Lessons Learned in the DI

Devonshire Initiative
The Devonshire Initiative has synthesized lessons learned from workshops, affiliate organization resources, and documents in the public domain related to cross-sector partnerships.

Due Diligence: Strong partnerships start with a strong foundation established through the due diligence process. Some lessons learned on due diligence are:

  • Know why you and the potential partner are interested in partnering
  • Get to know each other’s organizations
  • Build personal relationships and ensure there are common values and shared objectives

Communication: Strong communication is key in maintaining a strong relationship throughout the life of a partnership. Some lessons learned on communication are:

  • Communicate drivers, interests, and wants with the partner
  • Understand that partners don’t always communicate in the same ways
  • Communicate about the partnership with everyone in the organization

Evaluating Partnerships: Partnership evaluation is an ongoing process through the life of the partnership. Some lessons learned on evaluating partnerships are:

  • Use evaluations to continue improving the partnership
  • Don’t focus only on tangible and measurable benefits
  • Discuss boundaries and what is included in the evaluation

Strengthening Partnerships: This will help best ensure success of the partnership. Some lessons learned on strengthening partnerships are:

  • Formalize the agreement, establish timelines, make commitments
  • Establish good governance and accountability protocols
  • Commit adequate human resources to the partnership

To learn more, click here.

Gender Equality in Social Auditing Guidance

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Equality in Social Auditing Guidance

Business for Social Responsibility
This report provides guidance on how organizations can integrate gender equality considerations within social auditing methodologies and processes. It identifies several systemic barriers that prevent current social audits from being gender-sensitive and provides a variety of recommendations to overcome these barriers. It provides organizations with information, recommendations, and case studies on how gender equality can be integrated within current auditing practices, including existing auditing verification measures across the supply chain, and includes a series of worker interviews.

The report highlights five reasons why addressing gender equality issues in global supply chains makes business sense:

  1. Helps to meet business targets
  2. Maintains a strong and stable workforce
  3. Increases productivity and cost saving
  4. Ensures compliance
  5. Encourages worker engagement

To learn more, click here.

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • FFramework

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

Business for Social Responsibility
This resource provides guidance on conducting gender-responsive due diligence within supply chains to organizations and suppliers through the Gender Data and Impact (GDI) Framework. The source describes how to make the case for supplier diversity, conduct and analyze gender-responsive assessments, track progress and improve accountability, and communicate progress.

These actions are contained in four phases, which all have a corresponding checklist:

Phase 1: Assess and Analyze

  • Review brand business practices
  • Understand country context and risks
  • Assess supplier workforce performance, profile, and impact data
  • Collect GDI indicators
  • Analyze GDI tool findings

Phase 2: Integrate and Act

  • For brands: act, enable, and influence
  • For suppliers: prioritize issues, define measures and targets, and implement within the business

Phase 3: Track

  • Differentiate between intervention and specific indicators and business as usual indicators and their tracking frequency
  • Use supplier visits to review and discuss ongoing progress towards a specific outcome or to monitor overall gender equality performance
  • Ensure that data collection and tracking become business as usual practices
  • Involve workers and experts in reviewing progress made

Phase 4: Communicate

  • Use gender data within your business
  • Align communication about the GDI with the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communicate with stakeholders
  • Use the GDI to cover investors’ expectations
  • Encourage suppliers to use GDI findings with their core practitioners’ team and worker committees/unions to foster social dialogue

For more detail, click here.

People Want Their Employers to Talk About Mental Health

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

People Want Their Employers to Talk About Mental Health

Harvard Business Review
This article discusses how organizations can use an intersectional lens to approach and normalize conversations about mental health in the workplace.

In addition, this article includes a list of private sector good practices:

  • Start at the top: Encourage executive teams and senior management to share their experiences about mental health with their teams and employees.
  • Invest in education: Use training programs to equip managers and employees with the knowledge and resource to identify, normalize, and navigate mental health in the workplace.
  • Provide support: Ensure that employees have access to a variety of mental health benefits and related programs, and ensure that policies are communicated throughout the organization.

To learn more, click here.

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • CSA Group

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

CSA Group
This guide provides direction on the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has developed thisstandard to help organizations protect the mental health oftheir employees and encourage their wellness. There are several resources available, including an implementation guide, posters, case study research, and testimonials. Another of these resources is a handbook, which includes a step-by-step guide for organizations to implement the standard in four key phases: build the foundation, identify opportunities, set objectives, and implement.

To access the handbook, click here.

To learn more about the Standard, click here.

Dealing with Sexual Harassment When Your Company Is Too Small to Have HR

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Dealing with Sexual Harassment When Your Company Is Too Small to Have HR

Harvard Business Review
This Harvard Business Review article discusses what small companies can do to prevent and address sexual harassment.

Some of the recommendations discussed are:

  • Leaders should be conscious of the factors promoting a toxic work culture (e.g. predominately male executive staff, layers of hierarchy in power, indifference).
  • Leaders should establish clear policies outlining what constitutes sexual harassments, which behaviours will not be tolerated, and what employees should do if they see or experience misconduct.
  • Leaders should enforce these rules by designating clear roles for people within the organization.

To read the full article, click here.

A 15-Point Plan for Boards and CEOs to Eradicate Sexual Harassment in Their Organizations

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Leadership
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Forbes

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Board of Directors, CEO

LINK TO RESOURCE

A 15-Point Plan for Boards and CEOs to Eradicate Sexual Harassment in Their Organizations

Forbes
This resource provides a list of actions that leaders of organizations should take to eliminate sexual harassment in their workplaces.

  1. Establish accountability.
  2. Immediately request an audit of every open case of sexual harassment and a 5-10-year look-back of every closed, settled, sealed or discarded case ever brought to the organization’s attention.
  3. Introduce a sexual harassment hotline that bypasses HR, is administered by an outside provider, and is reported directly to the board.
  4. When a credible accusation is made, the accused should be put on a paid leave of absence while an investigation ensues.
  5. Do not dismiss, deny, defend, or blame the victim.
  6. Maintain and defend a pristine due process.
  7. Make it explicit in every way you can that harassment, abuse, or misbehaviour will not be tolerated.
  8. Be proactive.
  9. Put incentives in place.
  10. Clarify the role of HR in sexual harassment cases.
  11. Promote a “see something, say something” environment.
  12. Conduct bystander training throughout the organization.
  13. Leaders should actively protect someone that might be in danger.
  14. Get more women on boards and in C-suites.
  15. Beware of backlash.

To read more about this article, click here.

OHS Answers Fact Sheets – Violence in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Occupational Health and Safety

LINK TO RESOURCE

OHS Answers Fact Sheets – Violence in the Workplace

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
This resource is an extensive fact sheet from the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety on preventing violence in the workplace.The resourceincludes information on what work-related factors increase the risk of violence, elements to help recognize if the workplace is at risk, what can be done to prevent violence in the workplace, and examples of preventive measures.

What can I do to prevent violence in my workplace?

According to CCOHS, the most important component of any workplace violence prevention program is management commitment communicated through a written policy. The policy should:

  • Be developed by management and employees’ representatives, and apply to management, employees, clients, independent contractors, and anyone who has a relationship with your organization.
  • Define what workplace violence means in concrete language and provide clear examples of unacceptable behaviour and working conditions.
  • State in clear terms the organization’s commitment towards workplace violence and the consequences of violent acts.
  • Outline confidential processes to report incidents, encourage reporting, and ensure no reprisals.
  • Establish procedures to investigate and resolve complaints and commit to support victims.
  • Commit to fulfill violence prevention training to all personnel.

To access this full resource, click here.

List of Women’s Associations

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Outreach Initiatives and Partnerships

SOURCE
  • Women of Influence

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • LList

TARGET AREA
  • Employee Support, Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

List of Women's Associations

Women of Influence
This website provides a comprehensive list of industry-specific women’s associations in Canada that your organization could partner with to support gender equality efforts.

To see associations, click here.

My Career Toolkit: Professional Associations and Networking Groups

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Outreach Initiatives and Partnerships

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Employee Support, Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

My Career Toolkit: Professional Associations and Networking Groups

Catalyst
Catalyst has created a list of several professional associations and networking groups for women, LGBTQI, visible minorities, and people with disabilities around the world and in Canada. Some of the Canadian groups are:

  • The Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women (BPW)
  • Canadian Association of Women Executives & Entrepreneurs
  • Women’s Executive Network (WXN)
  • Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada (APAC)
  • Black Business and Professional Association (BBPA)
  • exeQutive
  • Canadian Association of Professionals with Disabilities

To learn about more groups, click here.