Supporting and Growing Women-Owned Businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Community Outreach, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supporting and Growing Women-Owned Businesses

Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders
In this research, the Canada-United States Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders has outlined specific initiatives to support women entrepreneurs.

Expanding the use of private sector supplier-diversity programs and increase outreach to women-owned businesses. “Best practices” capturing the full benefit of supplier diversity include:

  • Having a dedicated team focused on meeting specific supplier diversity targets.
  • Maintaining a central database of procurement needs and registered suppliers.
  • Prioritizing outreach efforts such as attending conferences and summits and working closely with networks, accelerators, and incubators in your sector.
  • Implementing a supplier diversity policy and a reporting mechanism.
  • Partnering with catalyzing organizations like WEConnect International, Women Business Enterprises Canada, National Women Business Owners Corporation (NWBOC) or Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC)to connect with women-owned businesses.

Challenge accelerators and professional networks to attract and develop women-owned businesses. “Best practices” that stand out in attracting and developing women entrepreneurs:

  • Tracking and transparency: MaRS Discovery District reached a 30 percent participation of female founders under the guidance of a female CEO.
  • Women-focused programming: Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneurial Winning Women program helped participants reach an average annual growth of 20 percent in revenue.
  • Co-ed networking: Entrepreneurs’ Organization provides all participants (male and female) with access to a network of entrepreneurs.
  • De-bias investment decisions: The Business Development unit in Bank of Canada conducted an independent accessibility review of all steps in a female entrepreneur’s journey.
  • Role modelling and public commitment: YPO Canada joined the #GoSponsorHer Challenge to encourage members to reach out to women entrepreneurs.

To learn more, click here.

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Supplier Diversity Playbook – Guidelines to Establishing a Successful Supplier Diversity Process

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
The Playbook is a guideline to establishing a successful supplier diversity process for the private sector and discussesfive key factors that are critical for creating a robust supplier diversity process. It also provides examples from companies successfully putting each of these elements into practice.

  1. Business case and executive support: Develop the business case defining the value proposition, identifying the current state (industry benchmarking), strategy alignment, and outcomes to be achieved.
  2. Opportunity identification: Identify opportunities to create a robust supplier diversity process through supplier analysis, supplier engagement, and supplier development.
  3. Supporting processes: Develop and strengthen supportive processes, including alignment, inclusive sourcing, communications, and management.
  4. Measuring and reporting: Develop metrics and reporting tools, such as a scorecard for supplier diversity reporting.

To read the full Playbook, click here.

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • UN Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Power of Procurement: How to Source from Women-Owned businesses

UN Women
This is a guide for gender-responsive procurement that provides corporations and their suppliers with a deeper understanding of challenges preventing women-owned businesses from fully participating in local and global value chains. It discusses key procurement topics such as:

Overcoming challenges facing women-owned business enterprises: The private sector can reform corporate procurement policies and practices to be more inclusive to support to overcome challenges facing women-owned businesses. Strategic sourcing practices include:

  • Increasing access to information and social networks
  • Streamlining the application process
  • Streamlining the contracting process
  • Limiting contract sizes
  • Establishing appropriate award criteria
  • Providing feedback
  • Paying promptly

Building corporate capacity and commitment: To reach a stage where gender-responsive procurement has become an integral part of the corporate culture and practice, an organization can develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses, identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management, etc. There are eight guidelines for introducing best practices:

  • Establish corporate policy and top corporate management support
  • Develop a corporate supplier development plan for women-owned businesses
  • Establish comprehensive internal and external communications
  • Identify opportunities for women-owned businesses in strategic sourcing and supply chain management
  • Establish comprehensive supplier development process
  • Establish tracking, reporting, and goal-setting mechanisms
  • Establish a continuous improvement plan
  • Establish a second-tier supplier program

To access this resource and learn more, click here.

Getting Gender Right

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Kantar

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Getting Gender Right

Kantar
Kantar’s report is designed to help marketers feel more confident making strategic branding decisions related to gender differences in response to marketing campaigns. The report is based on primary research with over 20,000 respondents in 43 countries, including Canada.

Some key recommendations include:

  • Be bold by consciously considering gender issues and challenging the status quo.
  • Acknowledge and embrace gender differences by recognizing outdated, over-simplistic targeting assumptions that reinforce old decision-making paradigms.
  • Employ the philosophy of “designing to the edges” to create ads that speak to everyone.
  • Assess media targeting and optimization by gender with an understanding that women are less receptive to online media.
  • Organizations need to acknowledge that gender equality is a journey which requires comprehensive gender progressiveness programs where effectiveness can be monitored and measured.

To read more, click here.

Gender Bias in Advertising: Research, Trends & New Visual Language

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Bias in Advertising: Research, Trends & New Visual Language

Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media at Mount Saint Mary’s University works with media and entertainment companies to improve how girls and women are reflected in media. The Institute developed this report to examine ways that the advertising industry has improved representation of women, and where it can do better.

The report includes a section that discusses what agencies and brands can do to address gender representation in advertising:

  • Think beyond the shortterm – one female-focused ad campaign might generate press, but it won’t ensure representation in the longterm.
  • Build women into the process, not just the results – place women in decision-making roles to add new dimensions to outdated gender-based stereotypes.
  • Look to the challengers – watch your challenger brands that are filling a niche market to see where the culture is headed.

To read more, click here.

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Koç Holding Company

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

Koç Holding Company
The Koç Group, an investment holding company from Turkey, developed this guide to help transform workplaces and advance gender equality through effective communication. Communications professionals can use the guide as a resource to overcome gender stereotypes in marketing, communications, and brand management.

Gender-sensitive communications requires questioning gender stereotypes and enables mainstreaming gender equality. Gender-sensitive communications can be defined as such:

  • Inclusive use of language and visuals
  • Positioning of men and women so that they are equally represented, have equal access to resources and opportunities, enjoy balanced roles and have equal share in decisionmaking

Consider the following elements for gender-sensitive communications:

  • Who?: Question related to representation

Assess: the ratio of men to women; the age of all individuals being represented; the physical appearance and clothing of men and women in visual materials; and, how their roles are being portrayed

  • What?: Question related to the distribution of resources

Assess: who uses the time and for how long; who is pictured in what place; who owns the resources and earns the money; who uses public domain spaces and for how long; who receives what information; who is responsible for what; and, who makes the decisions and implements them

  • Why?: Question related to elements preventing equality

Assess: who owns what and why; why objects or services meet the needs of only men or women; why we assign resources and roles to only one gender; and, why does the slogan address only one gender

  • How?: Question related to determining new course forward to advancing gender-sensitivity

Assess: How does my approach ensure gender equality; is a new framework possible that better ensures gender equality; and, can I change my approach

To learn more, click here.

A Guide to Progressive Gender Portrayals in Advertising – The Case for Unstereotyping Ads

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • The World Federation of Advertisers

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide to Progressive Gender Portrayals in Advertising - The Case for Unstereotyping Ads

The World Federation of Advertisers
This guide emphasizes the need for the advertising industry to move away from gender stereotypes in advertising and provides advice and recommendations on how to do so.

Some of the recommendations include:

  1. Encourage diversity in your teams: Does my internal team and partner team at my agencies reflect my target audience?
  2. Track performance: What is the representation of women versus men in our ads? Are we testing our ads with an equal number of men and women, etc.?
  3. Find your purpose: What does my brand stand for that benefits both men and women?
  4. Think longterm: Where do we want to be in the next three years on gender diversity and proper representation? Campaigners and consumers want to see real commitment that goes beyond a single message or a particular day.
  5. Go beyond marketing: How can I promote more positive, diverse portrayals of men and women internally and among suppliers?

To learn more, click here.

What Will it Take? Promoting Cultural Change to End Sexual Harassment

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • UN Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources, Legal, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

What Will it Take? Promoting Cultural Change to End Sexual Harassment

UN Women
This discussion paper provides guidance and insights to help employers prioritize the needs of the victim–survivors in sexual violence, harassment, and discrimination incidents. UN Women describe practical measures for cultural change, international normative standards, as well as several case studies of how organizations are approaching sexual harassment in the workplace. For instance, this paper states that establishing zerotolerance for sexual harassment in the workplace is critical and must be woven into the culture of an organization. Essential elements of zero-tolerance practice in an organization include always supporting individuals who report harassment, refusing to sanction perpetrators, and ensuring that equality and non-discrimination are integrated into its policies and practices.

UN Women identify five areas of work for lasting cultural change:

  1. Victim-focused work
  2. Training
  3. Collective ownership
  4. Zero tolerance
  5. Make reporting rational

To learn more, click here.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: How Companies can Prepare, Prevent, Respond and Transform their Culture

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: How Companies can Prepare, Prevent, Respond and Transform their Culture

Catalyst
This report discusses the action organizations can take to create a safe and fair work environment for all employees beyond policies and training. According to Catalyst’s report, these are four important actions:

Prepare

  1. Cultivate a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment. Take proactive steps to make this policy and your company’s commitment visible.
  2. Set guidelines to help employees understand appropriate norms for human interaction and affection in the workplace.
  3. Create processes to consider how sexual harassment affects women of colour and other marginalized groups in your organization.
  4. Educate yourself about your organization’s policies and procedures for when the board should be involved with or notified of sexual harassment complaints.
  5. Galvanize across functions to help employees have quick access to resources.

Prevent

  1. Accelerate parity in representation of women at all levels, including your Board of Directors.
  2. Educate and train leaders on forms of sexual harassment – including how to escalate.
  3. Focus on effective anti-sexual harassment training.

Respond

  1. Reinforce your company’s zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment and retaliation.
  2. Investigate all claims promptly and fairly.
  3. Honour the target of sexual harassment and follow up accordingly.
  4. Allow space for support, understanding, and, ultimately, compassion.

Transform

  1. Build a climate of respect and accountability.
  2. Evaluate your company’s dominant business culture.
  3. Address heavy alcohol consumption at work functions.

Additional sexual harassment resources from Catalyst can be found here or at the links below:

It’s Time: 5-Step Sexual Harassment Risk Mitigation Strategy for Employers

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • McInnis Cooper

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

It's Time: 5-Step Sexual Harassment Risk Mitigation Strategy for Employers

McInnis Cooper
This resource provides an overview of several provincial and federal occupational, health, and safety laws, human rights laws, employment standards laws, and criminal laws. It also details the importance of understanding business and financial liability risks, complaint mechanisms and systems, as well as the roles of perpetrators, victims, and employers. Canadian law firm McInnis Cooper has created a five-step risk mitigation plan to help employers minimize the growing legal, financial liability, and business risks of workplace sexual harassment. These steps include:

  1. Admit that sexual harassment can happen in any workplace.
  2. Make it a (high priority) corporate governance matter – the risks warrant it.
  3. Assess your current situation – and the current sexual harassment and violence risks.
  4. If you have a workplace sexual harassment policy, review and revisit it; if you don’t, develop and implement one now.
  5. Document everything and maintain the records (for a long time).

To learn more, click here.