Flexibility Focus Group Guidance – How to Run an Effective Focus Group on Workplace Flexibility

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Flexibility Focus Group Guidance – How to Run an Effective Focus Group on Workplace Flexibility

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This document provides guidance on how to run focus groups with your employees on flexibility in your organization (e.g. timing, participants, facilitator, questions, circumstances). Focus groups can reveal a wealth of information and deep insights that can be used to structure flexible working arrangements to meet the needs of both employer and employee. This tool also includes an extensive list of sample questions and a script for carrying out a focus group.

To learn more, click here.

Readiness Assessment – Is Your Organization Ready for a Strategic Approach to Flexibility?

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Readiness Assessment – Is Your Organization Ready for a Strategic Approach to Flexibility?

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This toolkit provides the framework and practical guide to conducting a systematic diagnosis of “where are we now” – a key input to building your workplace flexibility strategy. Prior to developing your workplace flexibility strategy, it is recommended to undertake a readiness assessment. Specifically, this toolkit aims to:

  • Provide a comprehensive framework for organizational flexibility
  • Enable organizations to plot where they are on the flexibility roadmap
  • Help organizations conduct a flexibility assessment

The following are the capabilities to be assessed for determining the organization’s readiness:

  1. Leadership: Evaluate executive leadership’s commitment to flexibility.
  2. Business case: Determine the strength of the business case for flexibility in the organization.
  3. Flexibility vision, strategy, and policy: Determine what flexibility means for the organization and how to achieve such vision.
  4. Management capability: How managers directly impact their employees’ working arrangements.
  5. Employee experience: Understand employee’s risks and needs for implementing flexible work.
  6. Results management: How performance and productivity are measured, and transparency.
  7. Technology and infrastructure: Evaluate the needs for flexible work and implemented resources.
  8. Client and supplier experience: Analyze how flexible work can impact their expectations.
  9. Learning cycle: Understand the organization’s learning needs and potential difficulties.
  10. Change management: Assess the existence of change management resources within the organization.

To learn more, click here.

Employee Flexibility Toolkit – How to Negotiate and Manage a Successful Flexible Working Agreement

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Employee Flexibility Toolkit – How to Negotiate and Manage a Successful Flexible Working Agreement

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This toolkit provides information and advice for introducing flexible working arrangements and integrating work practices into an employee’s job.This toolkit provides information about issues to consider:

  • What flexibility means in terms of changes to existing work arrangements
  • How to request flexibility to maximize your chances of success
  • Things to consider before requesting flexible working arrangements
  • How to make flexibility work for you
  • Dealing with issues that can arise over time

Learn more here.

Manager Flexibility Toolkit – How to Create Successful, Engaged and Productive Flexible Teams

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Manager Flexibility Toolkit – How to Create Successful, Engaged and Productive Flexible Teams

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
The aim of this toolkit is to provide information and guidance on how to successfully implement flexible working arrangements to maximize the opportunities and benefits that flexibility brings. The toolkit provides an overview of what workplace flexibility entails, benefits of workplace flexibility (e.g. productivity, effectiveness, job satisfaction), description of types of flexibility (e.g. flexible hours of work, compressed working weeks, telecommuting), and in-depth information on key flexibility elements to consider for managers.

The following are examples of good practices for managers found in this toolkit:

  • Leadership: Leaders should consider a flexible work arrangement themselves. This creates a role model within the organization demonstrating successful flexible work.
  • Team culture: Adjust communication tools and platforms to suit flexible work arrangements and consider communication training to help employees improve communication effectiveness.
  • Active learning: Establish a trial period to test a flexibility arrangement that works for the organization and the individual team.
  • Resource planning: Allocate tasks that suit flexible work options and use a central project planning tool to manage team’s workload and project advancement.
  • Information flow: Establish communication patterns such as daily project updates, weekly deadlines, set team meetings, etc.
  • Results-based performance management: Discuss performance as part of reviewing flexibility arrangements to make sure transparency, accountability, and autonomy are understood.
  • Self-management: Become aware of flexibility bias to learn and adapt to these arrangements.
  • Stakeholder management: Discuss and resolve issues around flexibility that can impact other internal stakeholders.
  • Legal risk management: Become aware about legal obligations related to flexible work.
  • Change management: Each team may go through an adjusting period to flexibility work.

To learn more, click here.

Building a Workplace Flexibility Strategy – A Guide to Building an Organization-Wide Approach to Implementing and Managing Workplace Flexibility

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Building a Workplace Flexibility Strategy – A Guide to Building an Organization-Wide Approach to Implementing and Managing Workplace Flexibility

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This guide provides a holistic frameworkto support a strategic approach to implementing organization-wide workplace flexibility programs. Specifically, the aims are to:

  • Ensure alignment between an organization’s workplace flexibility strategy, gender equality strategy, and broader business strategy.
  • Enable organizations to design a comprehensive workplace flexibility strategy.
  • Enable organizations to develop and implement an organization-wide approach for improving flexibility capability.

Also, this resource provides steps to building a workplace flexibility strategy:

  1. Envision a clear vision of what the organization looks like with improved flexibility.
  2. Ensure leadership commitment, support, and involvement, especially while running workshops.
  3. Develop specific goals and actions for each capability area (from the Readiness Assessment).
  4. Create an implementation plan based on the goals and actions with corresponding outcomes.
  5. Evaluate through an established learning cycle that includes pilot, testing, learning, adjustment, and retesting to find the best-suited strategy for the organization.

To learn more, click here.

Bias in Performance Management Review Process

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Cook Ross

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Bias in Performance Management Review Process

Cook Ross
This resource explains the four domains of bias in performance management: rater bias, self-rater bias, structural bias, and calibration bias. It also includes several examples of how to mitigate each type of bias.

Rater bias: Difference between in-person performance reviews between men, compared to between men and women.

Examples of how to mitigate rater bias:

  • Give performance reviews the importance they deserve – avoid haste and distractions.
  • Use a performance management assessment aid to guide the process.

Self-rater bias: Misrepresentation of an individual’s performance self-evaluation between accomplishments and self-image.
Examples of how to mitigate self-rater bias:

  • Raters should be conscious of the potential cultural or gender differences in self-rating.
  • Reduce self-rater bias on performance reviews by exercising practices of objectivity.

Structural bias: Bias found in and reinforced by organizational structure.
Examples of how to mitigate structural bias:

  • Have clear and transparent rating areas and weighting processes.
  • Expose structural biases prior to performance reviews and continually address them.

Calibration bias: Bias originated from relative rating of performance reviews.

 

Examples of how to mitigate calibration bias:

  • Having a clearly defined process for identifying and discussing bias throughout the calibration process will yield a more objective comparison between people.
  • Introducing bias management strategies prior to performance reviews allows the normalization of bias awareness and can assist in objective discussions during the calibration meeting.

To read more about biases and how to mitigate them, click here.

7 Ways You Might be Overlooking Talent – How Unconcious Bias can Play Out in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Center for Creative Leadership

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, CEO, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

7 Ways You Might be Overlooking Talent – How Unconcious Bias can Play Out in the Workplace

Center for Creative Leadership
This resource lists unconscious biases that negatively impact people’s opportunities to advance in their career and examples of specific actions to fight them. As female employees often face higher barriers to advancement due to bias and stereotypes, becoming aware of what those biases are can help address them.

  • Likeability: Depending on one’s dimension(s) of diversity (race, gender, ethnicity, etc.), one’s likeability may be perceived differently.
  • Similar to me: Unintentionally gives higher ratings to employees who are similar to them.
  • Personal: Individual preferences may prevent objective analysis of an employee.
  • Horns and halos: Managers may make assumptions that a particular type of employee is naturally good or bad at the job.
  • Stereotyping: People may assign attributes to an entire group and act upon those ideas.
  • Shifting standards: Leaders may not realize they’re applying more stringent standards to one similarly situated employee over another.
  • Confirmatory: Once a judgement or recommended action is made, people are highly motivated to find or produce evidence to justify it.

Examples of strategies for fighting unconscious bias at work:

  1. Look back at talent conversations and assess if any unconscious bias might have been at play.
  2. Assess past selection processes to determine if the candidates you considered were all men – perhaps all white men – and why.
  3. Establish a practice to recognize if your selection process is overlooking talent.

To learn more, click here.

Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Baseline Assesment
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising

SOURCE
  • Status of Women Canada

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Risk Management, Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

Status of Women Canada
GBA+ is an analytical tool that considers identity factors such as sex, gender race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that GBA goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. These factors are not an exhaustive list and only represent those listed explicitly in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The steps required to complete this intersectionality analysis are:

  1. Identify the key issue
  2. Challenge assumptions
  3. Gather the facts – research and consult

If information is not available, don’t abandon your analysis. Identify gaps in data and make data collection part of your initiative’s objectives and evaluation measures.

  1. Develop options and make recommendations

Using the data you have gathered, indicate how the options you propose respond to the specific issues you identified. Present your GBA+ findings to decision makers.

  1. Monitor and evaluate

Highlight data gaps and address unintended outcomes for diverse groups. Incorporate them into strategy renewals or management responses.

  1. Document

As GBA+ is an evidence-based process, it is critical to document your research and findings, including any consultations (formal or informal). List all individuals and organizations consulted, including notes from interviews.

  1. Communicate

Identify your target audiences, and tailor your messaging appropriately. Remember to share or discuss your GBA+ results within your organization. This will demonstrate due diligence, foster buy-in with stakeholders, and identify areas for further action.

To learn more about GBA+, click here, watch a step-by-step video guide here, or take a free online introductory course here.

Gender Inclusion & Diversity Toolkit – WIM

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising
  • Leadership
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Inclusion & Diversity Toolkit - WIM

Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters
This toolkit was written specifically for manufacturers in Canada and provides a set of practical tools to build awareness and engagement regarding gender inclusion and diversity.

The toolkit consists of the following seven tools:

  1. Tool #1: Starting the Conversation on Gender Inclusion and Diversity: This tool is meant to be used for leaders to facilitate a conversation with their team about diversity and inclusion. It includes a presentation with additional speaker notes and activities for breakout sessions.
  2. Tool #2: Inclusion & Diversity Roadmap: This tool consists of four roadmaps geared towards Employees, Human Resources Teams, Team Leaders, or Executive Teams. The roadmap outlines a visual representation of an inclusion and diversity learning path to map out steps towards goals.
  3. Tool #3: Respect in the Workplace Self-Assessment: This tool is a certification course offered by the Respect Group. It teaches respect in the workplace, the actions individuals can take to make a more inclusive workplace, and how to respond to inappropriate workplace behaviour.
  4. Tool #4: 10-Step Inclusivity Plan: This tool involves a 10-step plan that employees can follow to improve their understanding of the actions needed to create an inclusive workplace, and to encourage others to do so as well.
  5. Tool #5: Leader Guidebook for Men: This guide demonstrates how male champions can lead in gender inclusive behaviours, encourage others to do the same, and support female employees through sponsorship, among other best practices.
  6. Tool #6: Talent Management Guide: This guide outlines a variety of processes and practices that can be implemented by organizations to make their talent management more gender inclusive. It provides guidance for leaders and HR teams to attract and retain female talent in their organizations.
  7. Tool #7: Gender Inclusion & Diversity Roll-Out Plan: This plan describes how to implement the above six tools in your organization, including the objectives for each tool, the target audience for various communications, and draft email templates.

To learn more, click here.

The Design of Everyday Men – A New Lens for Gender Equality Progress

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Capacity Building and Awareness Raising
  • Leadership
  • Organizational Culture

SOURCE
  • Deloitte

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Design of Everyday Men – A New Lens for Gender Equality Progress

Deloitte
This research study looks at the perspective of men in order to advance gender equality in leadership. The study provides insight on the different experiences that men – and all genders – experience in today’s corporate culture. Results suggest three calls to action for business leaders to change the game on advancing gender equality – with men as active participants.

  1. Recognize that the expectations we set for success are causing gender inequality and causing certain genders or identities to be excluded from leadership. For instance, reflect both on formally established expectations in performance evaluations, and the informally reinforced expectations that are rewarded through day-to-day interactions and behaviours. “Always on, always available” corporate culture is a key barrier holding back gender equality. Men may more readily adhere to this expectation and sacrifice their outside-of-work commitments. As a result, those that become senior leaders are largely men – since women take up the slack on these outside- of-work responsibilities, thereby disadvantaging themselves.
  1. Self-reflect on your own behaviours and how you are establishing expectations for what success looks like through day-to-day actions. Here are some questions that can help this reflection:
    • How are you, as a leader, role modelling the behaviour you want to see from others?
    • How are you showing individuals that their peer group supports and embraces their actions, specifically in the everyday interactions between individuals?
    • How are you considering the individual’s interests, needs, and desires beyond their development as an employee?
    • How are you helping individuals embrace and accept their own imperfection as they develop both as employees and as people?
  1. Take action on breaking down the barriers to change in order to build a more gender-equal workplace. The resource provides five actions for business leaders and five actions for organizations. Some examples are:
    • For business leaders: start all meetings with a thoughtful personal story, check in on people who seem like they need it the least, take vacation and parental leave.
    • For organizations: build development programs around life goals – not just professional ones, define desired behaviours for success through a diversity lens.

To read more, click here.