EDGE Certification

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Measuring and Evaluating
  • Reporting

SOURCE
  • EDGE Strategy

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • CCertification

TARGET AREA
  • Standards and Certifications

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

EDGE Certification

EDGE Strategy
The EDGE assessment methodology and certification was launched in 2011 by the EDGE Certified Foundation at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum. The Foundation’s commercial branch, EDGE Strategy, helps companies apply for certification.

Levels of Certification:

EDGE Assess – Recognizing Commitment

EDGE Move – Showcasing Progress

EDGE Lead – Celebrating Success

Assessment Criteria:

  • Gender Representation: Strong gender balance at all levels of the organization
  • Pay Equity: A statistically insignificant unexplained gender pay gap
  • Effective Policies & Practices: A solid framework of effective policies and practices to ensure equitable career flows for both women and men
  • Inclusive Culture: An inclusive culture as reflected in employees’ high ratings in terms of career development opportunities

EDGE offers certification for country and global levels as well as business units or lines. Organizations are eligible for a global certification if they first complete a country certification, and 80 percent of their global workforce meets the EDGE standards. The business unit certification is typically completed as a pilot test for an organization or as a result of the ambitions of the business unit’s leader.

Certification Process:

  1. Measure – complete an online assessment
  2. Benchmark – see where your organization stands against the EDGE Standard and peer organizations and use these results to form an action plan
  3. Get Certified – an independent audit reveals what certification your organization will achieve
  4. Communicate – display and publicize your results
  5. Take Action – implement the EDGE action plan and strategic roadmap, and stay connected to emerging best practices within the EDGE community

On average it takes three months for an organization to prepare for the third-party audit required to achieve EDGE certification. The EDGE certification relies on third-party assessments and regulations regarding parties’ interaction: the EDGE Certified Foundation created and owns the methodology, but does not work with the companies; EDGE Strategy has permission to use the methodology and works with the companies but does not interact with the Foundation or the auditors; the auditors are trained by the Foundation but do not influence the standards or interact with companies.

Recertification Process:

Certifications are valid for two years. If an organization opts to forgo recertification when the time comes, it is disqualified from recertifying after that point for two years. To receive an “Assess” ranking, an organization has to go through the evaluation process and commit to implement action to improve, but an organizations can only hold the “Assess” certification without progressing for six years.

To read more about EDGE Certification, click here.

8 Ways to Measure Diversity That Have Nothing to Do With Hiring

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Career Development
  • Measuring and Evaluating
  • Organizational Culture
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Fortune

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

8 Ways to Measure Diversity That Have Nothing to Do With Hiring

Fortune
This article illustrates eight unique ways to measure the effectiveness of a business’s diversity and inclusion programs, beyond hiring and recruitment data.

The eight components to consider while measuring diversity are:

  1. Title and level within the company
  2. Rate and time of promotions
  3. Access to special projects
  4. Exposure to upper management
  5. Evaluate partnerships
  6. Check support groups
  7. Consider age
  8. Supplier diversity program

 

To learn more, click here.

Measuring Progress

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Intersectionality
  • Measuring and Evaluating

SOURCE
  • Project Include

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Measuring Progress

Project Include
Project Include is a non-profit that uses data and advocacy to accelerate diversity and inclusion solutions by offering recommendations about measuring diversity and inclusion progress in an organization.

Some recommendations include:

  • Set employee, leadership, board, and investor demographic diversity goals
  • Regularly conduct thoughtfully designed employee engagement surveys and demographic data
  • Regularly review and update data policies
  • Use inclusive demographic breakdowns, such as race, gender, and family status
  • Use existing metric definitions and surveys that have been effective in the past
  • Use metrics that are consistent across the industry
  • Be transparent about data findings internally and share some data externally
  • Ensure all sensitive data is stored and handled appropriately

To learn more, click here.

Meaningful Metrics for Diversity and Inclusion

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Measuring and Evaluating

SOURCE
  • Include Empower

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Meaningful Metrics for Diversity and Inclusion

Include Empower

This resource provides a series of steps to help organizations set, evaluate, and analyze meaningful diversity and inclusion progress.

There are nine steps in the series:

  1. Define which diversity dimensions you will monitor: Organizations can extend measurements beyond gender to other relevant metrics: such as race, ethnicity, and age.
  2. Review data policies: Ensure that data policies follow legal and ethical requirements.
  3. Select Metrics
    1. Identify bias blind spots: Representation, retention, recruitment, selection, promotion, development, pay and benefits, employee engagement, employee focus groups, etc.
    2. Track progress: Membership of ERGs, participation rates in formal mentoring programs or sponsorship schemes, participation rates in D&I training programs, etc.
    3. Measure return on investment: Revenue generated by new products or services, market share, cost savings, etc.
  4. Establish baseline measures: Use baseline measures to track impact/progress of an initiative by comparing results with the baseline measure.
  5. Set targets that are ambitious enough to encourage effort but realistic enough to avoid resistance.
  6. Assign responsibility and establish accountability at top levels (CEO, Board of Directors) through scorecards and other performance management tools.
  7. Track and analyze results: Have a formal plan for measuring progress and assign responsibility for reporting and responding to the findings.
  8. Report results and outline new initiatives: All results and rectification plans should be transparent internally for employee access and selected metrics should be disclosed externally.
  9. Review metrics regularly and change them as needed as the D&I program matures and business goals change.

To learn more, click here.

Vital Signs

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Measuring and Evaluating
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Catalyst

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Vital Signs

Catalyst
This resource includes several tools to help organizations use a diversity and inclusion lens, and better understand and measure their workforce. These tools include case studies, a guidebook, Excel template, and PowerPoint template. By using these tools, an organization will be able to identify, track, measure, and visualize patterns surrounding the evaluation and progression of talent in the workplace.

Vital Signs helps an organization examine the following components:

  • Representation
  • Hiring
  • Promotions
  • Voluntary turnover
  • Involuntary turnover
  • Key metrics comparison

For more information, click here.

Workplace Gender Equality Indicators (Key Progress Indicators)

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Measuring and Evaluating
  • Organizational Culture
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Our Watch

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Workplace Gender Equality Indicators (Key Progress Indicators)

Our Watch
This resource was developed to help workplaces collect, review, and respond to data about gender and diversity. It specifically identifies a number of gender equality indicators that organizations should be measuring and evaluating over time, and it provides information about how to collect and analyze these indicators in order to “make the case” for gender equality in the workplace.

This resource identifies eight key gender equality indicators and explains how to collect and measure the data:

  1. Ratio of men to women in workforce, overall and by teams.
  2. Ratio of men to women in leadership and management positions, including board, executive, senior and middle management level: For indicators 1-2, workplaces should collect and compare the number and percentage of women and men in each category.
  3. Ratio of male and female new hires and internal promotions, by level and department: Collect the number of female and males who are applying, and who have been hired and promoted across the organization in different departments and at all levels of seniority.
  4. Average salary gap between female and male staff members across the organization and by department: Collect and compare salary information from female and male employees across the organization and in different departments and levels of seniority.
  5. Comparison of male and female staff and managers who use flexible work arrangements.
  6. Comparison of male and female staff who use and return from parental leave with continued employment for 12 months: For indicators 5-6, workplaces should collect formal and informal data on the use of flexible work options.
  7. Changes in staff perception of workplace culture as measured by annual staff survey: Review questions being asked on annual surveys to ensure there are specific questions about gender equality.
  8. Reported incidents of sex-based discrimination and harassment: Track numbers, patterns, and responses.

To read the resource, click here.

Measuring What Matters in Gender Diversity

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Baseline Assesment
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps
  • Measuring and Evaluating
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Boston Consulting Group

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Measuring What Matters in Gender Diversity

Boston Consulting Group
The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) recommends organizations look at five overarching metrics when it comes to gender diversity. These metrics provide a quantitative snapshot of the company’s current state as well as softer data. After collecting these metrics, companies will be able to identify their biggest challenges and priorities that can be translated into goals.

  1. Pay: Assess pay levels, including base salaries and wages as well as discretionary pay (i.e. bonuses). Also, look at whether formulas behind performance bonuses include unintentional biases against women. Finally, survey employees to learn if they believe pay levels are equitable.
  2. Recruitment: Track the ratio of men to women along the entire recruiting funnel (i.e. applications, interviews, final rounds, hiring). This is of special interest for companies in industries that have historically struggled to attract women.
  3. Retention: Assess percentages of women and men at each level of seniority, and the attrition rate among women and men at each level. Also, assess employees’ perceptions at different levels to identify warning signals to retention issues.
  4. Advancement: Measure the percentage of women and men promoted each year as a share of the total cohort and compare both. Soft indicators of advancement can be women’s perception of a fair shot at senior and leadership positions.
  5. Representation: Assess the distribution of roles across different units to understand if women are concentrated in specific units. This can provide insight to whether women are fairly represented in operations units and not just administrative roles (e.g. HR or marketing).

Read the full article here.

Target Setting Calculator

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Target Setting Calculator

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
The Australian WGEA created this target-setting calculator for organizations to test a range of propositions to enable setting realistic, achievable gender targets. The approach involves developing two possible scenarios: 1) assuming no significant changes happen in the organization, and 2) assuming changes happen that decrease female turnover and/or increase female recruitment.

The calculator is composed of four tables:

  1. Table 1 collects data to understand gender compositions and key assumptions for the target groups (in raw numbers).
  2. Table 2 is populated automatically based on the data entered in table 1. This table shows the assumption of turnover and recruitment remaining constant and helps see the key variables that will impact gender composition of the target group over time.
  3. Table 3 shows the baseline data and allows for adjusting three key variables:
    1. Variable 1: variation of overall staff numbers
    2. Variable 2: turnover of women in target group
    3. Variable 3: percentage of women recruited (internally and externally).
  4. Table 4 allows testing alternative propositions of aspirational and ambitious targets. It is important to note that setting any type of targets requires conducting a thorough analysis to understand the feasibility of any target.

Here you can find a complete guide and an example of the calculator, and here you can download the calculator.

How to Set Gender Diversity Targets – Guidelines for Setting and Meeting Targets to Increase Gender Diversity in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Measuring and Evaluating

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

How to Set Gender Diversity Targets – Guidelines for Setting and Meeting Targets to Increase Gender Diversity in the Workplace

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This guide will assist your organization in setting realistic targets to improve the gender diversity of your workforce. If your organization has already achieved a desired gender balance, this guide may help in monitoring and maintaining that balance. Similar to setting financial or other operational targets within an organization, establishing realistic gender targets based on rigorous analysis and baseline data will significantly increase your chances of achieving the target. This guide includes a checklist of organizational elements required to support the achievement of targets and step-by-step instructions for target setting.

Checklist before you start target setting (the first three are a must):

  • Leadership commitment – from all levels of management
  • Strategic intent – gender equality has a strategy and plan
  • Stakeholder management – internal and external communication
  • Accountability – identifiable accountabilities
  • Measurement and reporting – commitment to embed targets into business units’ goals
  • Organizational culture and systems – reviewed policies and processes that impact gender equality

The seven-step target setting process outlined in the guide is as follows:

  1. Establish a target setting project team
  2. Define your target group
  3. Clarify your assumptions: Consider the size of the organization, possible restructuring changes, specific interventions already in place, etc.
  4. Conduct a thorough analysis: Identify actions, activities, or changes needed to meet the targets.
  5. Review employee turnover and recruitment: Use longterm data, break down turnover and recruitment.
  6. Establish a timeframe for achieving of the target: Five years is an effective period.
  7. Clarify accountabilities: Assign accountabilities and measuring, monitoring, and reporting processes.

Learn more here.

Gender Parity: Closing the Gap Between Commitment and Action

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Goal Setting
  • Recruitment, Retention and Promotion

SOURCE
  • LinkedIn

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Parity: Closing the Gap Between Commitment and Action

LinkedIn
In this blog, Bill Morris, retired president and senior managing director of Accenture Canada, shares the metrics that the company tracks and uses to set targets. These metrics are directly related to the ones found in the report “Advancing Women as Leaders in the Private Sector” from the Canada-US Council for Advancement of Women.

Accenture’s eight overall metrics are:

  1. Initial Recruitment of Women: Measured for each of their business units. According to Morris, this is what has made the difference.
  2. Attrition Rates of Women Relative to Men:Measured by business unit and level. According to Morris, the attrition gap data by level helps Accenture focus on maintaining gender parity as women advance.
  3. Advancement Rates of Women Relative to Men: Comparison between the percentages of women vs. men getting promoted from a cohort. Measured by business unit for each leader to reflect on the in-year promotion decisions. It is also tracked long-term to assess promotion patterns of the units.
  4. Pay by Gender: Currently Accenture doesn’t report on an aggregate average payroll for men vs. women. Accenture does a review prior to starting their annual compensation cycle, and then after rewarding decisions.
  5. Retention of Women after Becoming a Mother: Another metric to complement this one can be the retention of women and men when they anticipate starting a family.
  6. Representation of Women at Management Level: Business unit leaders are accountable for this metric.
  7. Representation of Women at Executive Level: Business unit leaders are accountable for this metric.
  8. Representation of Women at Senior Leadership Level: The CEO or the senior managing director is accountable for this metric.

Read more here.