Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • FFramework

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

Business for Social Responsibility
This resource provides guidance on conducting gender-responsive due diligence within supply chains to organizations and suppliers through the Gender Data and Impact (GDI) Framework. The source describes how to make the case for supplier diversity, conduct and analyze gender-responsive assessments, track progress and improve accountability, and communicate progress.

These actions are contained in four phases, which all have a corresponding checklist:

Phase 1: Assess and Analyze

  • Review brand business practices
  • Understand country context and risks
  • Assess supplier workforce performance, profile, and impact data
  • Collect GDI indicators
  • Analyze GDI tool findings

Phase 2: Integrate and Act

  • For brands: act, enable, and influence
  • For suppliers: prioritize issues, define measures and targets, and implement within the business

Phase 3: Track

  • Differentiate between intervention and specific indicators and business as usual indicators and their tracking frequency
  • Use supplier visits to review and discuss ongoing progress towards a specific outcome or to monitor overall gender equality performance
  • Ensure that data collection and tracking become business as usual practices
  • Involve workers and experts in reviewing progress made

Phase 4: Communicate

  • Use gender data within your business
  • Align communication about the GDI with the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communicate with stakeholders
  • Use the GDI to cover investors’ expectations
  • Encourage suppliers to use GDI findings with their core practitioners’ team and worker committees/unions to foster social dialogue

For more detail, click here.

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

Business for Social Responsibility
This guide provides a framework for companies to integrate gender equality considerations into the standards they use to set supply chain ethical requirements. This guidance addresses nine Code of Conduct Principles and each principle looks into traditional code language, the principle through a women’s lens, case study examples, recommendations for gender-sensitive language revisions, and leadership actions related to the principle:

  1. Discrimination: It is recommended that language be included to specify that the principle of non-discrimination applies to both women and men and that roles and needs specific to women.
  2. Wages and Benefits: Include language about equal remuneration for men and women for work of equal value, etc.
  3. Working Hours: Working hours should be fixed according to national and international limits, and delivery targets should not be set unrealistically and as a way to avoid overtime pay.
  4. Harassment and Abuse: Define harassment and related policies, detail training sessions, and explicitly mention sexual harassment.
  5. Health and Safety: Focus on worker wellbeing and make provisions to guarantee workers access to health services and insurance that serve the distinctive concerns and needs of both women and men.
  6. Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining: Include language that stresses the rights of both women and men to freedom of association and collective bargaining.
  7. Employment Relationship: Extend the application of the code of conduct principles to contracting, subcontracting, homeworking, and recruitment agencies. Considering women often have the most precarious or vulnerable employment status, include specific provisions to protect them.
  8. Management Systems: Code of conduct, policies, procedures, training, and record-keeping should be designed to operationalize the specific gender considerations integrated.

To learn more, click here.

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Marketing and Advertising

SOURCE
  • Koç Holding Company

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Advertising, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Marketing

LINK TO RESOURCE

A Guide to Gender Equality in Communications

Koç Holding Company
The Koç Group, an investment holding company from Turkey, developed this guide to help transform workplaces and advance gender equality through effective communication. Communications professionals can use the guide as a resource to overcome gender stereotypes in marketing, communications, and brand management.

Gender-sensitive communications requires questioning gender stereotypes and enables mainstreaming gender equality. Gender-sensitive communications can be defined as such:

  • Inclusive use of language and visuals
  • Positioning of men and women so that they are equally represented, have equal access to resources and opportunities, enjoy balanced roles and have equal share in decisionmaking

Consider the following elements for gender-sensitive communications:

  • Who?: Question related to representation

Assess: the ratio of men to women; the age of all individuals being represented; the physical appearance and clothing of men and women in visual materials; and, how their roles are being portrayed

  • What?: Question related to the distribution of resources

Assess: who uses the time and for how long; who is pictured in what place; who owns the resources and earns the money; who uses public domain spaces and for how long; who receives what information; who is responsible for what; and, who makes the decisions and implements them

  • Why?: Question related to elements preventing equality

Assess: who owns what and why; why objects or services meet the needs of only men or women; why we assign resources and roles to only one gender; and, why does the slogan address only one gender

  • How?: Question related to determining new course forward to advancing gender-sensitivity

Assess: How does my approach ensure gender equality; is a new framework possible that better ensures gender equality; and, can I change my approach

To learn more, click here.

People Want Their Employers to Talk About Mental Health

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Harvard Business Review

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

People Want Their Employers to Talk About Mental Health

Harvard Business Review
This article discusses how organizations can use an intersectional lens to approach and normalize conversations about mental health in the workplace.

In addition, this article includes a list of private sector good practices:

  • Start at the top: Encourage executive teams and senior management to share their experiences about mental health with their teams and employees.
  • Invest in education: Use training programs to equip managers and employees with the knowledge and resource to identify, normalize, and navigate mental health in the workplace.
  • Provide support: Ensure that employees have access to a variety of mental health benefits and related programs, and ensure that policies are communicated throughout the organization.

To learn more, click here.

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • CSA Group

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

CSA Group
This guide provides direction on the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has developed thisstandard to help organizations protect the mental health oftheir employees and encourage their wellness. There are several resources available, including an implementation guide, posters, case study research, and testimonials. Another of these resources is a handbook, which includes a step-by-step guide for organizations to implement the standard in four key phases: build the foundation, identify opportunities, set objectives, and implement.

To access the handbook, click here.

To learn more about the Standard, click here.

Including Gender Issues in Risk Assessment

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • European Agency for Safety and Health at Work

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Risk Management, Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Occupational Health and Safety

LINK TO RESOURCE

Including Gender Issues in Risk Assessment

European Agency for Safety and Health at Work
This guide provides a model for making risk assessment more gender-sensitive byfocusingon five stages of risk assessment and recommending how to include gender in each of them.

  1. Hazard Identification – include gender by:
  • Considering hazards prevalent in both male- and female-dominated jobs
  • Considering the entire workforce without forgetting part-time, temporary, and those employees on leave
  • Encouraging women to report issues
  1. Risk assessment – include gender by:
  • Not making assumptions based only on job description or title
  • Involving women in risk assessment
  • Including gender in stress, reproductive health, and musculoskeletal disorders assessments
  1. Implementation of solutions – include gender by:
  • Aiming to eliminate risks at source, to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees
  • Involving women in decisionmaking and implementation of solutions
  • Ensuring all genders are provided with OHS information and training relevant to their jobs

4 & 5.  Monitoring and Review – include gender by:

  • Keeping up to date with new information about gender-related occupational health issues
  • Recording occupational health issues and accidents

 

To access this resource, click here.

10 Keys for Gender Sensitive OSH Practice – Guidelines for Mainstreaming in Occupational Health and Safety

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • International Labour Office

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Institutional Policies, Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Occupational Health and Safety

LINK TO RESOURCE

10 Keys for Gender Sensitive OSH Practice - Guidelines for Mainstreaming in Occupational Health and Safety

International Labour Office
These guidelines help organizations take a gender-sensitive approach to mainstreaming gender into occupational safety and health policies and practices to provide a safer workplace for both women and men. The resource helps integrate gender issues into analyses, formulation, and monitoring of policies, programs, and preventive measures to reduce inequalities between women and men.

  1. Taking a gender mainstreaming approach to reviewing and developing OSH legislation
  2. Developing OSH policies to address gender inequalities in OSH practice
  3. Ensuring consideration of gender differences in risk management
  4. OSH research should properly take into account gender differences
  5. Developing gender-sensitive OSH indicators based on sex-disaggregated data
  6. Promoting equal access to occupational health services and health care for all workers
  7. Ensuring the participation of both women and men workers and their representatives in OSH measures, health promotion, and decision making
  8. Developing gender-sensitive OSH information, education, and training about the differences in the way women and men may be exposed to risks at work
  9. Designing work equipment, tools, and personal protective equipment for both men and women
  10. Working time arrangements and work-life balance

To read the full guidelines, click here.

Developing a Flexible Working Arrangement Policy

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Developing a Flexible Working Arrangement Policy

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This briefing note provides guidance on the key features of a flexible working arrangements policy. Organizations leading the way in workplace gender equality have in place a policy that specifically supports flexible working arrangements for all employees.

The key features of a flexible working arrangements policy are:

  • Statement
  • Purpose
  • Guideline (i.e. definitions, eligibility and exclusions, process, and performance and review)
  • References and resources (i.e. existing legislation and internal policies)

To learn more, click here.

Flexibility Business Case – Building Your Business Case for Flexible Work Through Workforce Metrics

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Flexibility Business Case – Building Your Business Case for Flexible Work Through Workforce Metrics

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This toolkit aims to help organizations identify the areas where flexibility could positively influence an organization’s productivity and employee engagement.It alsoprovides advice on how to measure the business benefit for flexible working through workforce metrics.

Specifically, this toolkit aims to:

  • Identify workforce metric categories and metrics to measure the benefits of flexible working
  • Provide steps on building your business case for flexibility through workforce metrics
  • Provide templates to collect and calculate workforce metrics

Metrics can be developed from the following categories:

  • Uptake and perceptions of flexible work
  • Attraction of employees
  • Employee retention
  • Training investment
  • Productivity and engagement
  • Absenteeism
  • Employee wellbeing
  • Office space accommodation costs
  • Workforce composition

To learn more about each category and their metrics, click here.

Flexibility Focus Group Guidance – How to Run an Effective Focus Group on Workplace Flexibility

Resource database

Resource Sidebar

ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TToolkit

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • All Management, All Units, CEO, Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources

LINK TO RESOURCE

Flexibility Focus Group Guidance – How to Run an Effective Focus Group on Workplace Flexibility

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This document provides guidance on how to run focus groups with your employees on flexibility in your organization (e.g. timing, participants, facilitator, questions, circumstances). Focus groups can reveal a wealth of information and deep insights that can be used to structure flexible working arrangements to meet the needs of both employer and employee. This tool also includes an extensive list of sample questions and a script for carrying out a focus group.

To learn more, click here.