Gender Equality in Social Auditing Guidance

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Equality in Social Auditing Guidance

Business for Social Responsibility
This report provides guidance on how organizations can integrate gender equality considerations within social auditing methodologies and processes. It identifies several systemic barriers that prevent current social audits from being gender-sensitive and provides a variety of recommendations to overcome these barriers. It provides organizations with information, recommendations, and case studies on how gender equality can be integrated within current auditing practices, including existing auditing verification measures across the supply chain, and includes a series of worker interviews.

The report highlights five reasons why addressing gender equality issues in global supply chains makes business sense:

  1. Helps to meet business targets
  2. Maintains a strong and stable workforce
  3. Increases productivity and cost saving
  4. Ensures compliance
  5. Encourages worker engagement

To learn more, click here.

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • FFramework

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Making Women Workers Count: A Framework for Conducting Gender Responsive Due Diligence in Supply Chains

Business for Social Responsibility
This resource provides guidance on conducting gender-responsive due diligence within supply chains to organizations and suppliers through the Gender Data and Impact (GDI) Framework. The source describes how to make the case for supplier diversity, conduct and analyze gender-responsive assessments, track progress and improve accountability, and communicate progress.

These actions are contained in four phases, which all have a corresponding checklist:

Phase 1: Assess and Analyze

  • Review brand business practices
  • Understand country context and risks
  • Assess supplier workforce performance, profile, and impact data
  • Collect GDI indicators
  • Analyze GDI tool findings

Phase 2: Integrate and Act

  • For brands: act, enable, and influence
  • For suppliers: prioritize issues, define measures and targets, and implement within the business

Phase 3: Track

  • Differentiate between intervention and specific indicators and business as usual indicators and their tracking frequency
  • Use supplier visits to review and discuss ongoing progress towards a specific outcome or to monitor overall gender equality performance
  • Ensure that data collection and tracking become business as usual practices
  • Involve workers and experts in reviewing progress made

Phase 4: Communicate

  • Use gender data within your business
  • Align communication about the GDI with the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to communicate with stakeholders
  • Use the GDI to cover investors’ expectations
  • Encourage suppliers to use GDI findings with their core practitioners’ team and worker committees/unions to foster social dialogue

For more detail, click here.

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Business for Social Responsibility

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Equality in Codes of Conduct Guidance

Business for Social Responsibility
This guide provides a framework for companies to integrate gender equality considerations into the standards they use to set supply chain ethical requirements. This guidance addresses nine Code of Conduct Principles and each principle looks into traditional code language, the principle through a women’s lens, case study examples, recommendations for gender-sensitive language revisions, and leadership actions related to the principle:

  1. Discrimination: It is recommended that language be included to specify that the principle of non-discrimination applies to both women and men and that roles and needs specific to women.
  2. Wages and Benefits: Include language about equal remuneration for men and women for work of equal value, etc.
  3. Working Hours: Working hours should be fixed according to national and international limits, and delivery targets should not be set unrealistically and as a way to avoid overtime pay.
  4. Harassment and Abuse: Define harassment and related policies, detail training sessions, and explicitly mention sexual harassment.
  5. Health and Safety: Focus on worker wellbeing and make provisions to guarantee workers access to health services and insurance that serve the distinctive concerns and needs of both women and men.
  6. Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining: Include language that stresses the rights of both women and men to freedom of association and collective bargaining.
  7. Employment Relationship: Extend the application of the code of conduct principles to contracting, subcontracting, homeworking, and recruitment agencies. Considering women often have the most precarious or vulnerable employment status, include specific provisions to protect them.
  8. Management Systems: Code of conduct, policies, procedures, training, and record-keeping should be designed to operationalize the specific gender considerations integrated.

To learn more, click here.

The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) Base Code

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Ethical Trading Initiative

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • BBenchmark

TARGET AREA
  • Indices and Benchmarks

TARGET UNIT
  • Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) Base Code

Ethical Trading Initiative
The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) is a leading alliance of companies, trade unions, and NGOs that encourages businesses to have responsible supply chains and participate in ethical trade. The ETI Base Code is based on the conventions of the International Labour Organization and is viewed as a global reference standard that can also be used as a benchmark to develop ethical trade action plans and conduct social audits. By joining ETI, a business commits to the ETI Base Code and the principles of implementation, which guides the company to effectively approach ethical trade. ETI members also have access to a variety of training resources, expert advice, networking, and peer support.

The ETI Base Code’s categories are:

  1. Employment is freely chosen
  2. Freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining are respected
  3. Working conditions are safe and hygienic
  4. Child labour shall not be used
  5. Living wages are paid
  6. Working hours are not excessive
  7. No discrimination is practiced
  8. Regular employment is provided
  9. No harsh or inhumane treatment is allowed

For more information, click here.

KnowTheChain

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Reporting
  • Supply Chain

SOURCE
  • Know The Chain

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • BBenchmark

TARGET AREA
  • Indices and Benchmarks

TARGET UNIT
  • Legal, Procurement

LINK TO RESOURCE

KnowTheChain

Know The Chain
KnowTheChain is a resource for companies and investors that benchmarks corporate practices in a variety of industries to help inform investors’ decisions.It also provides tools and resources to help companies be in compliance with both this act and the Modern Slavery Act.

The benchmarks evaluate a total of 23 indicators across the following themes:

  • Commitment and Governance
  • Traceability and Risk Assessment
  • Purchasing Practices
  • Recruitment
  • Worker Voice
  • Monitoring
  • Remedy

The benchmarks currently available are:

  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Food and Beverage
  • Apparel and Footwear

To learn more, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Domestic or Sexual Violence Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Domestic or Sexual Violence Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to domestic or sexual violence leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada, where applicable. Domestic or sexual violence leave allows employees to take time off if they, or their child, are experiencing or being threatened with domestic or sexual violence. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Critical Illness and Injury Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Critical Illness and Injury Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to critical illness leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada, where applicable. Critical illness leave allows employees to support a child or adult family member whose life is at risk due to illness or injury. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Compassionate Care Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Compassionate Care Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to compassionate care leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada. Compassionate care leave allows employees to support family members who have potentially life-threatening or terminal medical conditions. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • CSA Group

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Implementation, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Diversity & Inclusion, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Assembling the Pieces: An Implementation Guide to the National Standard of Canada for Phycological Health and Safety in the Workplace

CSA Group
This guide provides direction on the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has developed thisstandard to help organizations protect the mental health oftheir employees and encourage their wellness. There are several resources available, including an implementation guide, posters, case study research, and testimonials. Another of these resources is a handbook, which includes a step-by-step guide for organizations to implement the standard in four key phases: build the foundation, identify opportunities, set objectives, and implement.

To access the handbook, click here.

To learn more about the Standard, click here.

What Will it Take? Promoting Cultural Change to End Sexual Harassment

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • UN Women

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • RReport

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources, Legal, Senior Leadership

LINK TO RESOURCE

What Will it Take? Promoting Cultural Change to End Sexual Harassment

UN Women
This discussion paper provides guidance and insights to help employers prioritize the needs of the victim–survivors in sexual violence, harassment, and discrimination incidents. UN Women describe practical measures for cultural change, international normative standards, as well as several case studies of how organizations are approaching sexual harassment in the workplace. For instance, this paper states that establishing zerotolerance for sexual harassment in the workplace is critical and must be woven into the culture of an organization. Essential elements of zero-tolerance practice in an organization include always supporting individuals who report harassment, refusing to sanction perpetrators, and ensuring that equality and non-discrimination are integrated into its policies and practices.

UN Women identify five areas of work for lasting cultural change:

  1. Victim-focused work
  2. Training
  3. Collective ownership
  4. Zero tolerance
  5. Make reporting rational

To learn more, click here.