A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Intersectionality
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Ontario Human Rights Commission

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Development, Institutional Policies

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

Ontario Human Rights Commission
This primer provides organizations with practical guidance for developing effective and fair ways to prevent and respond to human rights issues, including harassment, discrimination, and accommodation needs. This resource also lists several components of an effective set of organizational policies, procedures, and practices, such as the importance of establishing commitment from senior leadership, consulting stakeholder and expert groups, as well as understanding the complexity and size of the organization. It also states that all policies, plans, and procedures should reflect the current state of law and policy, consider organizational structural changes and barriers, and identify new human rights issues that may emerge.

The OHRC suggests that a complete strategy to prevent and address human rights issues should include:

  • A plan for preventing, reviewing and removing barriers
  • Anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policies
  • An internal complaints procedure
  • An accommodation policy and procedure
  • An education and training program
  • Stakeholder consultation and communication strategies

To learn more, click here.

It’s Time: 5-Step Sexual Harassment Risk Mitigation Strategy for Employers

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Organizational Culture
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • McInnis Cooper

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • AArticle

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • CEO, Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

It's Time: 5-Step Sexual Harassment Risk Mitigation Strategy for Employers

McInnis Cooper
This resource provides an overview of several provincial and federal occupational, health, and safety laws, human rights laws, employment standards laws, and criminal laws. It also details the importance of understanding business and financial liability risks, complaint mechanisms and systems, as well as the roles of perpetrators, victims, and employers. Canadian law firm McInnis Cooper has created a five-step risk mitigation plan to help employers minimize the growing legal, financial liability, and business risks of workplace sexual harassment. These steps include:

  1. Admit that sexual harassment can happen in any workplace.
  2. Make it a (high priority) corporate governance matter – the risks warrant it.
  3. Assess your current situation – and the current sexual harassment and violence risks.
  4. If you have a workplace sexual harassment policy, review and revisit it; if you don’t, develop and implement one now.
  5. Document everything and maintain the records (for a long time).

To learn more, click here.

OHS Answers Fact Sheets – Canadian Government Departments Responsible for OH&S

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Wellbeing and Safety

SOURCE
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • LLegislation

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal, Occupational Health and Safety

LINK TO RESOURCE

OHS Answers Fact Sheets – Canadian Government Departments Responsible for OH&S

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
This resource provides a list of all agencies responsible for occupational health and safety in the federal, provincial, and territorial jurisdictions across Canada. The 14 jurisdictions in Canada – one federal, 10 provincial, and three territorial – each have their own occupational health and safety (OH&S) legislation. The federal health and safety legislation applies to employees of the federal government, including Crown agencies and corporations across Canada, as well as employees of federally regulated companies or sectors that operate across provincial or international borders.

Approximately 6 percent of the Canadian workforce falls under the OH&S jurisdiction of the federal government. The remaining 94 percent of Canadian workers fall under the legislation of the province or territory where they work.

To access the fact sheets, click here.

Federal and Provincial and Territorial Maternity and Paternity Leave Information

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Workplace Flexibility

SOURCE
  • Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Federal and Provincial and Territorial Maternity and Paternity Leave Information

Various provincial, territorial and federal legislation
Global Compact Network Canada created a table that contains information related to pregnancy/maternity and parental leave at the federal level, and for each province and territory in Canada. Pregnancy/maternity leave allows pregnant employees to take leave, and parental leave allows new parents to take leave. The information has been collected from the Canada Labour Code and provincial and territorial Employment Standards Acts (as of May 2020).

To download this table, click here.

Gender Pay Gap Calculator Guide – Technical Guide to Using the WGEA Gender Pay Gap Calculator

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Gender Pay Gap Calculator Guide – Technical Guide to Using the WGEA Gender Pay Gap Calculator

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This guide outlines how to use the Workplace Gender Equality Agency’s (WGEA) gender pay gap calculator to assist organization in conducting payroll analysis.

The guide provides information on how to:

  • Obtain and format data for use in the payroll analysis calculator (e.g. liaise with finance, payroll or other key departments to obtain remuneration and employee data)
  • Calculate gender pay gaps and obtain key information (e.g. gender ratio, pay analysis, gap analysis, remuneration composition between fixed and variable pay)
  • Generate additional information to analyze your data

There is also an eLearning module for using the calculator. To learn more, click here.

Designing an Equitable Remuneration Policy

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Guide to Gender Pay Equity

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This information sheet emphasizes the advantages of having a remuneration policy that incorporates gender pay equity components.

Some of the key components include:

  • Provide market-competitive remuneration to attract, motivate, and retain highly skilled employees
  • Drive a culture where financial rewards are directly linked to employee contributions and performance
  • Ensure all reward decisions are made free from bias and support diversity
  • Improve organizational performance
  • Obtain outcomes that reflect commercially responsible decisions on remuneration

The information sheet outlines the characteristics that make up an equitable remuneration policy, with specific recommendations for leader commitment, organizational accountability for ensuring that the policy is implemented, and transparency around data and data collection and analysis.

To learn more about features to include in your remuneration policy, click here.

Guide to Gender Pay Equity

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps
  • Goal Setting

SOURCE
  • Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Strategy

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Guide to Gender Pay Equity

Workplace Gender Equality Agency (Australia)
This document provides step-by-step guidance to understand the gender pay gap, identify gender-related pay gaps within your organization, and establish goals, strategies, and actions to improve gender pay equity.This guide acknowledges that organizations will be at different stages in the journey towards gender pay equity so the use of the steps will vary accordingly. Emphasis is placed on acknowledging that pay equity strategies should be developed in accordance with an overall gender equality strategy.
The steps in the guide are:

  1. Awareness and Understanding: Develop a basic understanding of key issues surrounding pay equity.
  2. Build a Business Case:Determine why pay equity is important for the organization.
  3. Gain Leadership Commitment: Secure buy-in from leadership to encourage them to evaluate and address pay equity issues.
  4. Data Analysis: Identify any gender pay gaps and investigate the causes.
  5. Strategy and Action:Build a clear set of goals and action plans.
  6. Review and Refine: Monitor and review pay equity continuously.

 

The steps in this guide resemble actions needed to address gender equality in the organization. Given that the gender pay gap is one of the biggest contributors to gender inequality, the need for taking these or similar steps is clear. Companies need to be aware that addressing gender inequality as a whole will not necessarily close the gender pay gap; this issue requires specific action.

To learn more, click here.

Interactive Job Comparison Tool for Small Businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps

SOURCE
  • Ontario Pay Equity Commission

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • TTool

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Interactive Job Comparison Tool for Small Businesses

Ontario Pay Equity Commission
This tool enables a small business employer to adapt their specific workplace information required to apply the job-to-job and proportional value comparison methods to determine required adjustments to wages. The tool is most effective as complement to the Step-by-Step to Pay Equity – Mini-Kit. Click here for access.

E-Learning Modules: Pay Equity for Small Businesses

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps

SOURCE
  • Ontario Pay Equity Commission

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • OOnline Learning

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Implementation

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

E-Learning Modules: Pay Equity for Small Businesses

Ontario Pay Equity Commission
These 15 educational modules take a user through each aspect of the pay equity process and include detailed explanations of technical terms used in pay equity. The modules also discuss how the various steps are applied. The modules reference other materials that may be of assistance to a user. Click here for access.

Pay Equity Plan Samples

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ATTRIBUTES
  • Closing Gender Wage Gaps

SOURCE
  • Ontario Pay Equity Commission

TYPE OF RESOURCE
  • GGuide

TARGET AREA
  • Canadian Legislation, Development

TARGET UNIT
  • Human Resources, Legal

LINK TO RESOURCE

Pay Equity Plan Samples

Ontario Pay Equity Commission
This resource provides access to pay equity plan samples for job-to-job and proportional value comparison methods. To access the sample plans and methods, please click here.